11 Popular Hangout Spots to Schmooze With the Stars

Special Features   11 Popular Hangout Spots to Schmooze With the Stars
 
Where to eat and drink to see—or feel like—your favorite industry insiders.
<a href="http://www.glasshousetavern.com">Glass House Tavern</a>
Glass House Tavern

After a hard night’s work, it’s customary to unwind with a drink, and Broadway performers are no exception. Playbill.com has confirmed that Bond 45 is reopening in the coming months at 221 West 46th Street, next door to Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and across the street from Hamilton, to cater to the Broadway community after dark. Until that opens, if you’re in or around the theatre district, or downtown for a concert at Joe’s Pub, here are 11 other places for schmoozing and socializing in star style. Check back to Playbill for more details!

Glass House Tavern (252 W. 47th Street)

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Glass House Tavern

Whether you’re looking for a pre-show dinner or post-show cocktail, Glass House Tavern on 47th Street (right next door to the Brooks Atkinson Theatre) is a staple bar-restaurant in the theatre district. The bar area often fills up after the curtain comes down and Broadway actors get out of costume. Post-show snacks include the Crispy Truffle Risotto Balls and Tavern Mac & Cheese.

Joe Allen/Bar Centrale (326 W. 46th Street)

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Bar Centrale

Since 1965, Joe Allen has been hanging show posters of short-lived shows on their wall. It has now become a Broadway tradition. The spot, on 46th Street (aka Restaurant Row), is a popular place for a pre-curtain meal. Bar Centrale, a secluded, unmarked bar above—which lives in a converted apartment with no outside signage advertising it to passersby—opens up at 5 PM for evening cocktails where A-listers have been congregating for years.

Sardi’s (234 W. 44th Street)

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Sardi’s

Instead of show posters, Sardi’s earned its décor reputation for caricatures of celebrities and theatrical greats. Their downstairs is mostly for dining, but up on their second floor is a bar for pre- and post-show imbibing along with a piano for occasional entertainment. Special events are oftentimes held on the fourth floor, where Broadway names meet the press and give interviews about their shows playing near the 44th Street hotspot.

Dutch Fred’s (307 W. 47th Street)

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Dutch Fred’s

Dutch Fred’s, a new Hell’s Kitchen cocktail bar that opened in April 2016, is a new hang for the theatrical community. They offer Broadway-themed drinks like The Curtain Call, a whiskey and rum concoction with lime juice, simple syrup and egg white topped with soda and shaved nutmeg.

Hurley’s Saloon (232 W. 48th Street)

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Hurley's

Right next door to the Longacre Theatre on 48th Street, currently home to A Bronx Tale, is Hurley’s Saloon, a popular hangout—especially when it comes to private parties, usually housed on their third floor. Since it’s so convenient for casts at close-by theatres, performers can usually be found hanging out after the show into the wee small hours of the morning.

Schmackary’s (362 W. 45th Street)

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Schmackary’s

For those looking to drink coffee instead of a cocktail, Schmackary’s attracts performers and theatregoers with a sweet tooth looking for a late-night snack. The popular 45th Street bakery boasts some of the most sought-after cookies in midtown. Broadway stars are often found there—sometimes behind the counter. During their annual Broadway Bakes, some of the biggest names on Broadway work behind the counters raising money for Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS.

Read HOW SCHMACKARY’S GOT ITS START

Characters (243 W. 54th Street)

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Characters

Going to Feinstein’s/54 Below? Catch you after the show at Characters, the Irish pub across the street on 54th. Following a late-night show at the popular midtown cabaret venue, both performers and audience members tend to migrate to the bar when the staff at Feinstein’s/54 Below have to set up for the next event. Shows are offered at 7 PM, 9:30 PM and 11:30 PM at the cabaret venue, so theatre folk can be at Characters all night—the bar is open until 4 AM.

The Library at The Public (425 Lafayette Street)

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The Library at The Public Emily Andrews

If you’re seeing a show downtown at The Public Theater, The Library opens daily at 5 PM right inside the theatre complex. Upstairs on the mezzanine level, The Library is ideal for post-concert cocktails. The bar is open until 1 AM Thursdays-Saturdays. (It closes at midnight Mondays-Wednesdays and at 11 PM on Sundays.)

Phebe’s Tavern & Grill (361 Bowery)

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Phebe’s

Outside the Public after a Joe’s Pub show, performers oftentimes venture to Phebe’s Tavern & Grill, located around the block. The bar is open until 2 AM, and there is a back room to accommodate larger crowds.

Blockheads and Mother Burger (Worldwide Plaza)

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Worldwide Plaza (Blockheads and Mother Burger)

Frequented during the summer months, spot performers and creatives any time at Worldwide Plaza, where they sit outside at either Blockheads (a popular Mexican joint with bulldog margaritas—the frozen drink with a Coronita on top!) or Mother Burger (a burger joint offering toppings ranging from nachos to bacon-pineapple salsa).

Birdland (315 W. 44th Street)

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Birdland

Looking for something to do on Broadway’s night off? Jim Caruso’s Cast Party, the popular open-mic night in New York, is a meet-and-mingle for industry folk and hopefuls every Monday night at 9:30 PM. Wicked’s tour Elphaba, Jessica Vosk, was discovered there before she made the leap from Wall Street to Broadway. The club also hosts various concerts and shows during the weeknights with performers on and Off-Broadway.

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