A Collection of Caruso's Letters, Never Before Seen, Will Go on Display

Opera   A Collection of Caruso's Letters, Never Before Seen, Will Go on Display
 
An exhibition of 1,200 previously unknown letters written by legendary tenor Enrico Caruso will open on June 17, the London Guardian reports.

The letters, which will be shown along with some 800 other documents, including letters written to Caruso, belong to an industrialist from northern Italy, who inherited them from his grandfather. The owner, who wishes to remain anonymous, wanted the collection to be made available to the public before he died.

Handwriting experts have confirmed that the letters were, indeed, written by Caruso.

The collection includes letters to Ada Giachetti, the tenor's mistress of 11 years. In one letter, Caruso writes about performing the weeping-clown scene in Leoncavallo's I pagliacci. When Canio weeps because he believes his wife has been unfaithful to him, Caruso wrote, he cried real tears as he thought of Giachetti's real infidelities.

Giachetti had an affair with Caruso's chauffeur, and then ran away with him. She was later put in prison for trying to extort money from Caruso.


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