Alice Ripley Goes Hollywood in New Ludwig Play

News   Alice Ripley Goes Hollywood in New Ludwig Play Side Show Tony nominee Alice Ripley has landed her newest role.

Although she will not be part of the Broadway company of Little Shop of Horrors — Ripley starred in the developmental engagement in Florida — the actress-singer will be back on the stage in September in the newest comedy from award-winning playwright Ken Ludwig. On her official website, Ripley posted this message, "I am ecstatic to deliver the good news that I have been cast in a new play by Ken Ludwig called Shakespeare in Hollywood, which will play at the Arena Stage in D.C. this fall. When I got the news, I put my face in my hands and cried with happiness. The play is hilarious." Shakespeare in Hollywood will play the Arena Stage Sept. 5-Oct. 19. The Arena stage website describes the Ludwig play thusly: "In an enchanted wood on a Hollywood soundstage, a comedy of errors is brewing. While Groucho Marx and Tarzan rush through the commissary, a lovely up-and coming starlet dreams of fame and love on the set of A Midsummer Night's Dream. She is immediately smitten with the mysterious and beguiling Oberon — but like his Shakespearean counterpart, this spellbinding fellow causes rapturous mayhem wherever he goes." For more information, visit www.arena-stage.org.

Alice Ripley, who recently headlined a production of Tell Me On a Sunday at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, earned a Tony nomination for her performance as conjoined twin Violet Hilton in the musical Side Show. She has also appeared on Broadway in The Rocky Horror Show, James Joyce's The Dead, Sunset Boulevard, The Who's Tommy, Les Misérables and in the City Center Encores! production of Li'l Abner as well as the concert run of King David. Last summer, Ripley starred in the Kennedy Center's production of Company and reprised her role as fearful bride Amy on TV's "Kennedy Center Honors." Ripley's non-show recordings include two discs with Side Show co-star Emily Skinner — "Duets" and "Unsuspecting Hearts" — and a recording of her own compositions, the critically acclaimed "Everything's Fine."