Andrew Lloyd Webber Begins Discussions for Bway Bombay Dreams

News   Andrew Lloyd Webber Begins Discussions for Bway Bombay Dreams Lord Andrew Lloyd Webber, the award-winning composer who produced the London production of Bombay Dreams, will travel to New York next week to begin casting discussions for an upcoming Broadway mounting of Dreams. Kaye Rogaski, a spokesperson for the musical, confirmed the news to PBOL Sept. 27.

Lord Andrew Lloyd Webber, the award-winning composer who produced the London production of Bombay Dreams, will travel to New York next week to begin casting discussions for an upcoming Broadway mounting of Dreams. Kaye Rogaski, a spokesperson for the musical, confirmed the news to PBOL Sept. 27.

The composer of Evita, Sunset Boulevard, Cats and a slew of other titles, told The New York Times Sept. 26, "For the first time in my life, I'm a composer believing in another composer. "If [Bombay Dreams] worked in New York, and I underline if, I think it would galvanize the American musical."

An original work about the Bombay film industry, otherwise known as Bollywood, Bombay Dreams officially opened at London's Apollo Victoria Theatre on June 19, 2002. Under the direction of Steven Pimlott, who helmed the revival of Lloyd Webber's Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, the musical features music by A.R. Rahman, lyrics by Don Black and a book from novelist-writer-comedian Meera Syal. The London cast recording — featuring Raza Jaffrey, Preeya Kalidas and Ramon Tikaram — was released in the U.S. by Sony Classical in August.

Rogaski said that casting for the Broadway production will be conducted primarily in New York with a possibility of Toronto auditions as well. There is no theatre secured at this time, although those involved are aiming for a debut in 2004.

Lloyd Webber also told the Times that the production is "a hit with a completely new audience in London, namely kids who thought musicals were uncool. Whether we're able to do that with an American audience, I don't know." Only four months into its run, the London production has already recouped 40 percent of its original investment.