Annual "Best Plays" Tome Now Available in Stores

News   Annual "Best Plays" Tome Now Available in Stores "The Best Plays of 2000-2001," the latest book in the acclaimed series that dates back to 1920, will be in stores this month.

"The Best Plays of 2000-2001," the latest book in the acclaimed series that dates back to 1920, will be in stores this month.

Available from Limelight Editions, the annual tome is a permanent record of the 2000-2001 theatre season. Under new series editor Jeffrey Eric Jenkins, the release honors ten New York-based dramas, three plays from resident theatres and — for the first time — essays about these shows from distinguished theatre critics. The celebrated publication also offers facts and figures about the theatre season in and around the country as well as illustrations from famed caricaturist Al Hirschfeld.

Broadway, Off-Broadway and Off Off-Broadway plays that opened between June 1, 2000, and May 31, 2000, were eligible for consideration, and the choices were made by Jenkins after consultation with the Best Plays editorial board. The 2000-2001 board comprised Robert Brustein, Tish Dace, Christine Dolen, Mel Gussow, Robert Hurwitt, John Istel, Chris Jones, Julius Novick, Michael Phillips, Christopher Rawson, Alisa Solomon, Jeffrey Sweet, Linda Winer and Charles Wright.

The Best Plays of 2000–2001 are Boy Gets Girl by Rebecca Gilman (Chris Jones, essayist); The Invention of Love by Tom Stoppard (Charles Wright, essayist); King Hedley II by August Wilson (Christopher Rawson, essayist); Lobby Hero by Kenneth Lonergan (Tish Dace, essayist); Mnemonic by Complicite (John Istel, essayist); Nocturne by Adam Rapp (Robert Brustein, essayist); The Play About the Baby by Edward Albee (Christine Dolen, essayist); The Producers by Mel Brooks and Thomas Meehan (Julius Novick, essayist); Proof by David Auburn (Bruce Weber, essayist); and Urinetown by Greg Kotis and Mark Hollmann (Jeffrey Sweet, essayist).

The 460-page book sells for $47.50. For more information, go to www.BestPlaysOnline.com. —By Andrew Gans