Archaeologists Unearth 2,300-Year-Old Theatre

News   Archaeologists Unearth 2,300-Year-Old Theatre
 
Australian archaeologists have unearthed a 2,300-year-old theatre on the eastern Mediterranean island of Cyprus, Agence France-Presse reported.

The Cypriot antiquities department issued a statement saying, "The Australian team has uncovered the oldest theatre in Cyprus: a structure that was used as a venue for performance and spectacle for over six and a half centuries, from c. 300 BC until its final destruction in the earthquakes of AD 365."

That means it was in use toward the end of the Greek classical era, and continued to be used for shows throughout most of the golden age of the Roman Empire.

The Australian Archaeological Mission from the University of Sydney found the outdoor amphitheatre-style playhouse at Nea Paphos, on Cyprus' southwestern coast, where they have been digging for two decades.

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