Audience Members Review Seinfeld's B'way Show

News   Audience Members Review Seinfeld's B'way Show
 
The barricades were up on either side of the Broadhurst Theatre's stage door long before the end of Jerry Seinfeld's 10 PM show Aug. 6. Behind the sawhorses were a collection of the curious and the disappointed, who weren't able to score tickets to the comedian's sold-out, 10-show Broadway run, but who nonetheless hoped to catch a glimpse of the sitcom idol.
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Photo by Photos by Starla Smith

The barricades were up on either side of the Broadhurst Theatre's stage door long before the end of Jerry Seinfeld's 10 PM show Aug. 6. Behind the sawhorses were a collection of the curious and the disappointed, who weren't able to score tickets to the comedian's sold-out, 10-show Broadway run, but who nonetheless hoped to catch a glimpse of the sitcom idol.

Their spirits were a trifle dampened by one of New York's Finest -- though not friendliest -- who kept up the mantra, "Behind the barricades or goodbye." A half dozen picketers were on hand to protest an episode of "Seinfeld" in which the Puerto Rican flag was accidentally burned. But apparently they didn't quell the excitement inside the theatre. Afterward, Playbill On-Line asked members of the audience what they thought of the show.

"I think everyone in there was a fan," said one woman as she passed out of the hall, and, indeed, it seemed every occupant of the Broadhurst was pleased with their private audience with the king of observational humor.

"It was great. He talks about things that happen in everyday life," said New Jersey native Lori Peterson, who was all smiles as the first person to exit the concert. A fan of the sitcom "Seinfeld," she had never seen the comic live, and said she was not disappointed.

Half of Cary Eisner's pleasure seemed to be drawn from his amazement in having secured the much-sought-after tickets. "[The show was] probably better than the series," said the Tenefly, NJ, resident, another fan of Seinfeld's TV work. "Because I'm sure all the shows are going to be slightly different." It was hard to find anyone familiar with Jerry's pre-"Seinfeld" work. However, one savvy New Yorker -- who declined to give her name -- was on to the comedian. "I knew a lot of the jokes," she said. "At least half of them. A lot of it was old material." Nonetheless, she gave the show her stamp of approval. "He was hysterical. Very professional delivery. The timing was great."

Husband and wife Jill Miller and David Sweibell came all the way from Florida, where they tune into "Seinfeld" in syndication every night at 7:30 PM. They made the trip to visit their two daughters, who surprised them with the tickets. "It was great. I loved it. What a talent," said the effusive Miller. "He took a lot of things that he had been doing through the years and just expanded upon them," Sweibell said.

Some attendees had their favorite jokes, including the concert's first 15 minutes, in which Seinfeld discussed the television show, which aired its final episode last spring. But most shared the opinion of self-described super-fan Jesse Pinkus, a curly-haired kid from Long Island. "The whole thing was pretty funny," he said. "I laughed straight through."

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