Bernadette Peters Won't Be Getting Annie's Gun Anytime Soon

News   Bernadette Peters Won't Be Getting Annie's Gun Anytime Soon
 
Back in May, Playbill On-Line reported that Irving Berlin's musical comedy, Annie Get Your Gun, would likely be coming to Broadway in the spring, after a national tour. At the time, producers Fran and Barry Weissler were considering both film actress Geena Davis and stage actress Bernadette Peters for the title role.

Back in May, Playbill On-Line reported that Irving Berlin's musical comedy, Annie Get Your Gun, would likely be coming to Broadway in the spring, after a national tour. At the time, producers Fran and Barry Weissler were considering both film actress Geena Davis and stage actress Bernadette Peters for the title role.

The casting was later narrowed down to Peters, but because of her busy schedule, the show will not come to Broadway this season -- and there are no specific plans for the revival after that. Peters' agent, Judy Katz, told Playbill On-Line (Oct. 24), "It's not gonna happen for awhile. There were meetings and discussions, but for now, it's all speculation." Katz also said the Weissler's want Peters and don't intend to bring Gun to Broadway with a different star. Early on, Chicago's James Naughton had been rumored for the role of Frank.

Asked if there was any further information on Gun, the Weissler office (Oct. 24) said only that the Pete Sanders office was handling the show's publicity. However, asked about Gun, a Sanders spokesperson told Playbill On-Line, "We have no information on it."

Peters will be seen again, briefly, in one of her most famous roles: the witch in Into The Woods, which gets an anniversary revival Nov. 9. She's also busy filming a TV-movie, Holiday In Your Heart (to air Dec. 14), where she plays a country-western singer. Her most recent album was Sondheim Etc., released in April on the Angel label.

Annie Gets Your Gun tells of rootin'-tootin'-shootin' Annie Oakley, who nevertheless falls for Frank, the kind of man who wants the girl that he marries to be "as soft and as pink as a nursery" -- not quite a perfect match for a gal used to "doin' what comes natur'lly." The title role was originated on Broadway in 1946 by Ethel Merman.

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