Best Leading Actor in a Play: Christopher Plummer

Tony Awards   Best Leading Actor in a Play: Christopher Plummer At 10:20 PM ET, Susan Sarandon presented the Best Leading Actor in a Play Award to Christopher Plummer for his work in Barrymore.
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At 10:20 PM ET, Susan Sarandon presented the Best Leading Actor in a Play Award to Christopher Plummer for his work in Barrymore.

Here is Mr. Plummer's bio:

CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER(John Barrymore) has enjoyed almost 50 years as one of the theatre's most distinguished actors and as a veteran of international renown in over 60 motion pictures.
Mr. Plummer is a Canadian from Montreal, where he made his professional debut on stage and radio in both French and English and where, as a youngster of 17, he played Posthumus in Shakespeare's Cymbeline under the direction of the late Fyodor Komisarjevsky. Eva Le Gallienne gave him his Broadway debut in The Star Cross Story in 1954, and in the same season he appeared in Christopher Fry's The Dark is Light Enough with Katharine Cornell. In 1955 he played Jason opposite Dame Judith Anderson's Medea at the Theatre Sarah Bernhardt in Paris and was Marc Antony in Julius Caesar, the American Shakespeare Theatre's inaugural production.
In 1955-56 he played opposite Julie Harris in Anouilh's Broadway success The Lark, and in the same season represented Canada as Henry V with the Stratford Festival company at the Edinburgh Festival and on home ground. Over the ensuing years he starred on the stages of Broadway and London's West End in many a celebrated production: Anouilh's Becket, Giraudoux's Amphitryon, Peter Shaffer's The Royal Hunt of the Sun, Brecht's Arturo Ui, Anthony Burgess' musical Cyrano, Elia Kazan's production of Archibald MacLeish's J.B., Neil Simon's The Good Doctor and, at the Public Theater, Doctorow's Drinks Before Dinner, directed by Mike Nichols.
His most recent Broadway appearances were as Iago opposite James Earl Jones's Othello in the 1981-82 Tony Award-winning production; as Macbeth opposite the Lady Macbeth of Glenda Jackson; and in Harold Pinter's No Man's Land, co-starring with Jason Robards. He has also been a leading actor at Great Britain's National Theatre under Sir Laurence Olivier, the Royal Shakespeare Company under Sir Peter Hall and the Stratford Festival in its formative years under Sir Tyrone Guthrie and Michael Langham.
Since Sidney Lumet introduced him to the screen in Stage Struck in 1957, Mr. Plummer has appeared in a host of films, from the Academy Award-winning The Sound of Music and The Man Who Would Be King to The Silent Partner, Murder By Decree, Waterloo, The Pink Panther, Eyewitness, Star Trek VI, Spike Lee's Malcolm X, Mike Nichols' Wolf, Taylor Hackford's Dolores Claiborne, Terry Gilliam's Twelve Monkeys and many others. His television credits include the award-winning B.B.C. "Hamlet at Elsinore," "Oedipus Rex," "Don Juan in Hell," "The Thorn Birds," "The Money Changers," "Young Catherine" and, most recently, the series "Counterstrike." He has co-written and performed two one-man shows for television, on Stephen Leacock and Vladimir Nabokov, and has also written and directed for theatre and the concert hall. He has created, with Michael Lankester, three new concert versions of Peer Gynt, A Midsummer Night's Dream and Prokofiev's Ivan the Terrible, and among his many recordings are, most recently, Walton's Henry V, with the Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields conducted by Sir Neville Marriner, and Ivan the Terrible, with the London Symphony under Rostropovich. His one-man evening A Word or Two, Before You Go has raised money for World Literacy, The Shakespeare Theatre in Washington, D.C., the new Laura Pells Theatre in New York's Roundabout, the Stratford Festival and the newly formed Atlantic Theatre Festival in Nova Scotia.
Mr. Plummer has received Great Britain's Evening Standard Award, the Tony Award, two Emmy Awards, two New York Drama Desk Awards, the Theatre World Award, the Delia Austrian Medal, the Outer Critics' Circle Award and Canada's Genie Award, and has been nominated for many more. He was made a Companion of the Order of Canada in 1968 and has also been awarded Austria's Golden Badge of Honour and Salzburg's Chalice of Honour. In 1982 he was the first recipient of the Maple Leaf Award for Arts and Letters in New York, and in 1990 The Shakespeare Theatre (Washington D.C.) presented him with its coveted William Shakespeare Award. An Honorary Doctor of Fine Arts at New York's Juilliard School, he also holds a Lifetime Achievement Award from the State of Connecticut. In 1986 in New York City he was elected into Theatre's Hall of Fame.

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