Circle in the Square Posthumously Honors Eugene O'Neill at the Site of the Golden Swan (Photo)

PlayBlog   Circle in the Square Posthumously Honors Eugene O'Neill at the Site of the Golden Swan (Photo)
 
The Circle in the Square Theatre, under the direction of Theodore Mann and Paul Libin, paid tribute to playwright Eugene O’Neill this past weekend with a special plaque placed on the former site of the Golden Swan (also known as the Hell Hole), one of O’Neill’s inspirations for Harry Hope’s saloon in The Iceman Cometh.


The outdoor ceremony took place at West 4th Street and Sixth Avenue (where the Golden Swan was located) and was presented by Mann and Libin. Renowned O’Neill biographers Arthur and Barbara Gelb as well as other O’Neill enthusiasts were on hand for the presentation.

It was Circle in the Square’s highly acclaimed revival of The Iceman Cometh in May 1956—followed that same year with the American premiere of O’Neill’s Long Days Journey into Night, for which he was awarded posthumously a Pulitzer Prize—that initiated a re-evaluation of O’Neill and led to his recognition as one of American’s greatest playwrights. Since the 1956 Iceman revival, Circle in the Square has produced 19 O’Neill productions — more than any other theatre.

Next up at Circle in the Square Theatre will be the first Broadway revival of the musical Godspell, with previews scheduled to begin Oct. 13 and opening night set for Nov. 7.

Theodore Mann and Paul Libin presenting the plaque at the site of the Golden Swan:

[caption id="attachment_16992" align="aligncenter" width="460" caption="Paul Libin and Theodore Mann, with the Circle in the Square plaque honoring Eugene O’Neill and the Greenwich Village site of the Golden Swan, one of the inspirations for Harry Hope’s saloon in The Iceman Cometh. (photo by Jonathan Mann)"]Paul Libin and Theodore Mann, with the Circle in the Square plaque honoring Eugene O’Neill and the Greenwich Village site of the Golden Swan, one of the inspirations for Harry Hope’s saloon in <i>The Iceman Cometh</i>. (photo by Jonathan Mann)[/caption]

To see the inscription on the plaque, look below:

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