Denman, d'Arcy James, Barzee and Patterson Sought for New White Christmas Stagings

News   Denman, d'Arcy James, Barzee and Patterson Sought for New White Christmas Stagings White Christmas, the new stage musical based on the 1954 holiday film, was such a hit at San Francisco's Curran Theatre during the recent holiday season that, as previously reported, productions will pop up nationwide this fall. Its original Bay Area quartet of actors may again star in the property.
Brian d'Arcy James
Brian d'Arcy James

Brian d'Arcy James, Anastasia Barzee, Jeffry Denman and Meredith Patterson, who starred in the San Francisco production, are all being sought to repeat their duties, the show's choreographer Randy Skinner told Playbill.com columnist Harry Haun. It is not clear which of the coming mountings they are wanted for. White Christmas will have three separate sit-down companies this fall: one in Los Angeles, one in Boston and one in San Francisco. James (Titanic) and Denman ( The Producers) filled the roles made famous by Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye opposite Barzee (Urinetown) and Patterson (42nd Street), who took on the sister roles played by Rosemary Clooney and Vera Ellen.

The 1954 film "White Christmas" centers on the story of two former World War II Army vets who team up for a song-and-dance act. The duo soon meet up with a sister song-and-dance act and head to a Vermont lodge to perform a Christmas show. The lodge happens to be owned by the boys' former general.

David Ives (All in the Timing, Wonderful Town) penned the book to the new Christmas musical based on the Paul Blake's script for the world premiere stage adaptation at St. Louis' The Muny. The original screenplay was written by Norman Krasna, Norman Panama and Melvin Frank.

The original musical comedy starred Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye, Vera Ellen and Rosemary Clooney singing such Berlin songs as "The Best Things Happen When You're Dancing," "Sisters," "Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep," "Mandy," "Geee! I Wish I Was Back in the Army," "Snow," "Choreography," "What Can You Do With a General?" and the classic title song.