Director Walter Bobbie Exits Coming Sweet Charity Broadway Revival

News   Director Walter Bobbie Exits Coming Sweet Charity Broadway Revival Walter Bobbie is no longer director of the upcoming Broadway revival of Sweet Charity, a spokesman confirmed.

Walter Bobbie at the June 2000 Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS benefit
Walter Bobbie at the June 2000 Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS benefit (Photo by Aubrey Reuben)

The reason given was that Bobbie and producer Barry Weissler could not concur on the makeup of the show's creative team. The parting was described as amicable. Recently, the out-of-town performance schedule has been in flux. The Broadway run will now open in January 2004, the spokesman said.

Marisa Tomei is still headlining the quirky, romantic, urban musical comedy about a dance hall hostess with a heart of gold (and a penchant for singing songs like "If My Friends Could See Me Now," "Where Am I Going?" and "There's Gotta Be Something Better Than This").

The Neil Simon-Cy Coleman-Dorothy Field show from 1966 was a triumph for creator-director-choreographer Bob Fosse and actress Gwen Verdon. A film starred Shirley Maclaine as the innocent Charity, who lives hopefully ever after that she'll find a mate. A 1986 Broadway revival (overseen by Fosse, who died shortly after) starred Debbie Allen. There was talk in recent seasons that Paula Abdul was attached to a tour of the show (it never materialized).

The previously announced tryout engagements were the Canon Theatre in Toronto May 20-June 29, and Chicago's Shubert Theatre July 1-20, followed by August Broadway previews. A spokesman said various scenarios are being explored.

The show will mark the Broadway musical comedy debut of Marisa Tomei, who won the Academy Award for "My Cousin Vinnie." Her Broadway debut was a revival of the thriller Wait Until Dark two seasons ago.

Robert Cuccioli has been offered the role of Italian movie star Vittorio Vidal, who has a brief encounter with Charity, leading her to sing "If My Friends Could See Me Now." (Vittorio also gets the ballad "Too Many Tomorrows.")