Elephant Man w/ Burton, Crudup and Glass Music, Starts March 26 at Bway's Royale

News   Elephant Man w/ Burton, Crudup and Glass Music, Starts March 26 at Bway's Royale The casting of Kate Burton and Rupert Graves in the new Broadway revival of The Elephant Man, widely reported for weeks, has now been made official. Burton, who ended her well-received stint as Hedda Gabler earlier this month, will play Mrs. Kendal opposite Billy Crudup's John Merrick, and Rupert Graves will be Dr. Treves. Graves was last seen on Broadway in Patrick Marber's Closer.

The casting of Kate Burton and Rupert Graves in the new Broadway revival of The Elephant Man, widely reported for weeks, has now been made official. Burton, who ended her well-received stint as Hedda Gabler earlier this month, will play Mrs. Kendal opposite Billy Crudup's John Merrick, and Rupert Graves will be Dr. Treves. Graves was last seen on Broadway in Patrick Marber's Closer.

Producer David Aukin (Noises Off) had planned to do the show in London's West End but then changed his plans when Crudup expressed interest. The show has officially been announced for Broadway's Royale Theatre, with previews to start March 26 and an opening set for April 14, 2002.

Designers have also been chosen for the production, including Santo Loquasto (set and costumes), James Ingalls (lighting) and David Shapiro (sound). Famed serialist composer Philip Glass (The Photographer, Einstein on the Beach) will create original music for the intermissionless staging, which is produced by David Aukin for Act Productions, Waxman/Williams Entertainment, Bob Boyett, Steve Martin & Joan Stein, and Manhattan Theatre Club, according to spokespersons at the Boneau/Bryan-Brown press office.

Sean Mathias, director of Broadway's starry revival of Dance of Death, will direct The Elephant Man. The play, set in 1880s London, tells of a hideously-deformed circus freak abused by his keepers and rescued by a scientist, who treats him civilly but makes him something of a faddish curiosity among the intelligentsia.

After a successful Off-Broadway run, The Elephant Man transferred to Broadway April 19, 1979 at the Booth Theatre. Jack Hofsiss directed the drama, which starred Kevin Conway as Dr. Treves, Philip Anglim as John Merrick, and Carole Shelley as Mrs. Kendal. The play, Hofsiss and Shelley all won Tony Awards, with the drama also picking up a New York Drama Critics Circle Award. Among actors who took over the lead were pop star David Bowie and "Star Wars" star Mark Hamill. David Lynch, post-"Eraserhead" but pre-"Twin Peaks," directed the 1980 movie version of "The Elephant Man," with Anthony Hopkins, Anne Bancroft and John Hurt starring. Since then, the show has been subject to parody, including The Elephant Man: The Musical, which has made numerous Off-Off-Broadway appearances; and a segment in the Mel Smith movie comedy "The Tall Guy," in which Jeff Goldblum plays an actor who appears in a musical based on "The Elephant Man," complete with a row of tap dancers wearing elephant heads. Beyond that, the dialogue line, "I am not an animal, I am a human being" has become something of an oft paraphrased comic punchline, though the line, "Sometimes I think my head is so big because it is full of dreams" is also well remembered.

Actor Crudup came to the fore in the aforementioned Broadway revival of Bus Stop and has since done well in movies, including a featured role in "Almost Famous." He also appeared this past summer in a Shakespeare-in-the-Park staging of Measure for Measure.

*

The Elephant Man is further testimony to Broadway's current obsession with stage hits from the Carter and Reagan years. The past two seasons have seen major revivals of Amadeus, 42nd Street and Noises Off, with Into the Woods and Morning's at Seven on its way.