Elms, Glimmer & Suite Under Roundabout Season Consideration

News   Elms, Glimmer & Suite Under Roundabout Season Consideration
 
Along with the previously-announced Off-Broadway Give Me Your Answer, Do! starring Joel Grey (see below), and the Broadway revival of The Rainmaker, starring Woody Harrelson, The Roundabout Theatre Company is currently telling subscription members that several other plays are under consideration for its 1999-2000 season, including a new work by Warren Leight, a compilation from Neil Simon, and revivals of by Eugene O'Neill and Kaufman & Hart. Asked about the season schedule, Roundabout spokesperson Erin Dunn told PBOL (July 8) nothing had been decided on except for Answer, Do! and Rainmaker.

Along with the previously-announced Off-Broadway Give Me Your Answer, Do! starring Joel Grey (see below), and the Broadway revival of The Rainmaker, starring Woody Harrelson, The Roundabout Theatre Company is currently telling subscription members that several other plays are under consideration for its 1999-2000 season, including a new work by Warren Leight, a compilation from Neil Simon, and revivals of by Eugene O'Neill and Kaufman & Hart. Asked about the season schedule, Roundabout spokesperson Erin Dunn told PBOL (July 8) nothing had been decided on except for Answer, Do! and Rainmaker.

Here, according to the subscription brochure, are shows under the Roundabout's consideration:

* The Glimmer Brothers by Warren (Side Man) Leight, directed by Scott Ellis. In Glimmer, Warren Leight, author of this year's Tony Award-winning Best Play, returns to the world of music in this poignant family drama. The play tells of Daniel and Martin Glimmer, twin brothers once united in their love of jazz but now long estranged. When Martin lands in the hospital, his godson Jordan and Daniel's daughter Delia try to bring the two brothers back together. Glimmer has a world premiere run at The Williamstown Theatre Festival, July 14-25, in a production starring David Schwimmer (TV's "Friends," "Six Days, Seven Nights," and "The Pallbearer"), John Spencer, Terry Beaver and Kim Raver.

Leight already has a successful history with the Roundabout. Side Man had been playing at the CSC space in downtown Manhattan before the Roundabout picked it to fill the space in its season that was to have gone to a failed Bacharach-David musical revue.

* Desire Under the Elms by Eugene O'Neill, directed by David Leveaux. O'Neill's classic 1920s drama chronicles a New England farm family and their degeneration into adultery and greed. The play was brought up on obscenity charges during its original Broadway run, but the jury found O'Neill innocent. The Tony Award-winning Leveaux recently directed Pinter's Moonlight for The Roundabout, with Broadway credits including: O'Neill's Anna Christiewith Liam Neeson and Natasha Richardson (Tony Award for Best Revival) and A Moon for the Misbegotten (Tony nomination for Outstanding Direction). * You Can't Take It With You by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart. The Pulitzer Prize-winning comedy was first staged in 1936 and follows an eccentric household where each family member creates his own chaos. The play was later made into an Academy Award-winning film.

* Hotel Suite by Neil Simon, directed by Rob Marshall, is an amalgam of Simon's previous "Suite" plays, combining four one-acts from his California Suite, London Suite, and Plaza Suite. After premiering earlier this year at Philadelphia's Walnut Street Theatre, where it starred Marina Sirtis (of "Star Trek: The Next Generation"). Hotel Suite's four scenes, are, in order: Visitors from London from California Suite, about an Oscar-nominated English actress and her husband; Visitor from Philadelphia, also from California Suite, about a couple from Philly, one of whom wakes up with a stranger; Diana and Sydney from London Suite, a second look at the English couple of the first scene; and Visitor from Mamaroneck from Plaza Suite, about a bride with pre wedding jitters. Charles Abbott will direct the show.

*

As for Give Me Your Answer, Do!, that play will feature Tony and Oscar-winning star of the original Cabaret, Joey Grey, alongside Kate Burton, John Glover and Michael Emerson. The production begins previews Sept. 10 for a Sept. 30 opening.

The play is set in Donegal, Ireland where novelist Tom Connolly and wife Daisy nervously await the decision of their American houseguest as to whether he will purchase Tom's papers for a U.S. college library -- a deal which would offer some compensation for Tom's recent literary paralysis.

Although Grey recently appeared as Mr. Cellophane in the revival of Chicago, he hasn't officially starred in a play since Larry Kramer's The Normal Heart in 1985.

Tony and OBIE winning actor Glover won his awards for playing not one but two roles as twins in both the stage and screen versions of Terrence McNally's Love! Valour! Compassion!.

Though Michael Emerson is currently featured in the ensemble for The Iceman Cometh, audiences may be more familiar with him through his performance as the original Oscar Wilde in the long-running OB hit, Gross Indecencies.

Kate Burton stepped in for the final weeks of Beauty Queen of Leenane for Marie Mullen. She also replaced Kate Nelligan in An American Daughter. Burton's other credits include: Company, Jake's Women, Some Americans Abroad (Drama Desk Nomination),Wild Honey, Doonesbury, Alice in Wonderland, and Present Laughter (a role for which she won a Theatre World Award).

Kyle Donnelly, a former Associate Artistic Director of Arena Stage, has been signed to direct. With Answer, The Roundabout continues its relationship with Friel, having previously produced the American premiere of Friel's Molly Sweeney and a revival of Philadelphia, Here I Come!. Other plays by Friel include the 1992 Tony Award-winning best play, Dancing at Lughnasa, Lovers, The Mundy Scheme, The Loves of Cass McGuire, Faith Healer, Aristocrats, Wonderful Tennessee and The Freedom of the City.

The design team for Answer includes Tom Lynch (sets), Martin Pakledinaz (costumes), and Kenneth Posner (lighting).

[Other big news for Friel: The Abbey Theatre and Gate Theatre of Ireland is staging a three-play, Brian Friel mini-festival at Lincoln Center's Summer Festival, July 6-25. The Gate is mounting Friel's translation of Uncle Vanya and his 1979 drama, Aristocrats. The Abbey, meanwhile, serves up the 1973 play, The Freedom of the City.]

*

As for The Rainmaker, that revival is set to open Nov. 11 at The Brooks Atkinson Theatre.

In the N. Richard Nash play, Woody Harrelson will star as Starbuck, the handsome conman who drifts into a small town during a drought and changes the lives of the townspeople. Jayne Atkinson (Lincoln Center's Ivanov, How I Learned to Drive) will play Lizzie Curry, a spinster who falls in love with Starbuck and the promise he brings. Nash's play is also the basis for the Jones Schmidt musical, 110 in the Shade.

Though The Atkinson is not a usual venue for The Roundabout, the company must produce outside their own spaces since they lost their Broadway home at The Criterion Center. The company plans on moving into Broadway's Selwyn Theatre as soon as renovations are complete.

Scott Ellis (1776, Steel Pier) will direct the revival, after helming a production of the play at the Williamstown Theatre Festival last summer. The Williamstown production also featured Atkinson as Lizzie.

Harrelson first caught the public eye when he joined the cast of television's "Cheers" as naive bartender Woody. Since that time, Harrelson has starred in several movies -- successfully breaking the association with his "Cheers" character -- including: "The People vs. Larry Flynt," "Natural Born Killers," "Kingpin," "The Hi-Lo Country," "The Money Train" and "White Men Can't Jump".

-- By Sean McGrath

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