Find Out Why The Lying King, and Its Hit Song "A Tuna Frittata," Were Censored by Queen Elizabeth

News   Find Out Why The Lying King, and Its Hit Song "A Tuna Frittata," Were Censored by Queen Elizabeth
 
Today in 1595, the political musical thriller The Lying King opened at the Old Amsterdam Theatre, shocking audiences and enraging the Crown. Written by harpsichord prodigy Elton Don John, The Lying King claimed that former King Henry VIII – father to Queen Elizabeth I – was an inveterate fabricator whose misdeeds severely damaged England’s moral standing on the world stage.

Featuring songs such as "The Circle of Fife Players," "Can You Feel the Doves Tonight," and "A Tuna Frittata," The Lying King exposed Henry’s pathological fibs and called for reform.

Needless to say, Queen Elizabeth was furious that the Censor had approved such treasonous content, and soon discovered that his permissiveness had been motivated by lust: he was engaged in an affair with The Lying King star Cheetah Primavera. The Censor was promptly executed.

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Elizabeth demanded that producers of The Lying King remove all political content from the show. The musical that emerged from this purge was virtually unrecognizable, but enormously popular for its puppets, appealing music, and rotating cast of real-life D-list barons and baronesses. With more than 166,000 performances under its belt, it continues to run today.

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