George Margo, American Actor Who Found Home in London, Dead at 86

News   George Margo, American Actor Who Found Home in London, Dead at 86 George Margo, an American-born actor who distinguished himself in a number of film, TV and stage roles in London, died of cancer Jan. 9 at the age of 86, it was revealed recently in an obituary in The Stage.

George Margo, an American-born actor who distinguished himself in a number of film, TV and stage roles in London, died of cancer Jan. 9 at the age of 86, it was revealed recently in an obituary in The Stage.

Mr. Margo was born in New York City in 1915 and at the age of 18 answered an advertisement for someone to drive a car to California. He took the job and would later begin acting in San Francisco.

Serving in the Army in World War II, he was stationed in Germany and performed in shows for troops. He was transferred to London, and trained at RADA, graduating in 1948.

He made his professional debut in the first London production of Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman, directed by Elia Kazan, at the Phoenix in 1949. Among his other West End credits are Detective Story (1950), It Remains to Be Seen (1952), Stalag 17 (1953), Guys and Dolls (1953), The Desperate Hours (1955) and Mrs Gibbons' Boys (1956).

Mr. Margo also appeared on many TV shows and was heard on radio. The Stage reported that in 1957 he was in the play, Requiem for a Heavyweight, in which Sean Connery had an early leading role. On film, he appeared with Benny Hill in "Who Done It?," Frankie Howerd in "A Touch of the Sun" and Bob Hope in "The Iron Petticoat." Other films include "The Mouse That Roared," "Hell Is Sold Out," "The Red Beret," "Lilacs in the Spring," "Joe Macbeth" and "After the Ball."

He was featured in the British premiere of Fortune and Men's Eyes at the Open Space in 1968 and played the Prosecutor in a TV production of "The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui" in 1972.

In 1975 "a domestic crisis forced him back to the U.S.," The Stage reported. He never returned to his longtime home, London.

In California again, he appeared in TV shows and directed plays such as The Evolution of the Blues in San Francisco, J.F.K. Lives in Los Angeles and Bird of Paradise in New York.

His wife, three children from his second marriage and three stepchildren from his third marriage survive him.

— By Kenneth Jones