Gilman to Surge into Parks' Place at Public in Spring

News   Gilman to Surge into Parks' Place at Public in Spring Rebecca Gilman's Blue Surge, which played the Goodman Theatre last summer, has been added to the Public Theater's spring roster, pushing the formerly announced Suzan-Lori Parks work Fuckin' A to the 2002-03 season. No cast or specific dates have been attached to the Gilman play.

Rebecca Gilman's Blue Surge, which played the Goodman Theatre last summer, has been added to the Public Theater's spring roster, pushing the formerly announced Suzan-Lori Parks work Fuckin' A to the 2002-03 season. No cast or specific dates have been attached to the Gilman play.

Parks' Fuckin' A was to have been the final production of the 2001-02 Public season, though dates for the production were never nailed down. Parks is a hot property for the Public right now. With Topdog/Underdog, she is experiencing her biggest success to date. The play ran at the Public last summer to general acclaim. Plans to transfer it to Broadway finally bore fruit last month when it was announced Topdog would land at the Ambassador Theatre in March. The likely stars are Jeffrey Wright and the rap star Mos Def. George C. Wolfe directs. The show will join another Public-to-Broadway transfer: Elaine Stritch at Liberty

Blue Surge was staged by Goodman artistic director Robert Falls at the Albert Ivar Goodman Theatre, from June 29 to Aug. 5, 2001. The punning title of Blue Surge (blue serge is a type of suit, once a staple of every man's closet) ostensibly refers to two underground policeman in the drama, who arrest two "massage parlor workers" in a small Midwestern town. During the interrogation of the suspects, however, the four discover they went to high school together and associated with the same group of people. The ensuing revelations cause one of the cops to question his role in the arrest.

Robert Falls, who won a Tony for Death of a Saleman, will direct the show again at the Public.

Since Gilman debuted in New York with Spinning Into Butter at Lincoln Center Theater, her work has rarely been absent from Gotham stages. Subsequent productions include Boy Gets Girl at Manhattan Theatre Club and The Glory of Living at MCC. —By Robert Simonson