How To Tell Broadway From Off-Broadway From...

Special Features   How To Tell Broadway From Off-Broadway From...
 
Several readers have written asking for a definition of the difference among Broadway, Off-Broadway, and Off-Off-Broadway.
Broadway v Off-Broadway v Off-Off-Broadway lead image

Several readers have written asking for a definition of the difference among Broadway, Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway.

The distinction generally has to do with theatre size (but not 100 percent of the time). Theatres with up to 99 seats generally are considered Off-Off-Broadway; 99-499 seats generally denote Off-Broadway; and 500 and larger generally denote Broadway. There are many exceptions, however, and some overlap. The real key is what sort of contract the production has.

The fact that Broadway is the name of a large boulevard in Manhattan sometimes confuses theatregoers as well. Many theatres were located on Broadway, the street, at the turn of the 20th century when the nickname was bestowed. But today only three "Broadway" theatres are actually on Broadway: the Winter Garden, the Marquis, and the eponymous Broadway Theatre.

Off-Broadway theatres can be located anywhere in New York, but most are congregated in Greenwich Village and the West Side. And Off-Off-Broadway theatres are also located throughout the city.

Broadway v Off-Broadway v Off-Off-Broadway infographic
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