In 35th-Anniversary Concert, Trisha Brown Continues to Bring New Technology to Dance

Classic Arts News   In 35th-Anniversary Concert, Trisha Brown Continues to Bring New Technology to Dance
 
The Trisha Brown Dance Company celebrates its 35th anniversary with two programs at Lincoln Center, starting tonight.

Tonight's program, reprised on April 15, contains three of the choreographer's collaborations with artist Robert Rauschenberg. For their first collaboration, Rauschenberg designed the sets and costumes for 1979's Glacial Decoy, in which dancers perform in front of slide projections of his works. In 1989's Astral Convertible, an industrial set contains motion sensors that engage the lighting and sound systems in response to the dancers' movements. The program also features Set and Reset, from 1983.

Brown has also collaborated, over the course of her career, with such artists as Donald Judd and Nancy Graves.

The program scheduled for April 14 and 16 features the New York premiere of how long does the subject linger on the edge of the volume . . ., a work that had its world premiere on April 9 at Arizona State University. The work also uses motion-capturing technology, which in this case translates the dancers' movements into graphics, which are then projected onto the stage.

Also on the second program are Geometry of Quiet and the New York premiere of PRESENT TENSE, set to music by John Cage.


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