National Ballet of Canada Posts Surplus, Names New Studio

Classic Arts News   National Ballet of Canada Posts Surplus, Names New Studio
 
The National Ballet of Canada has posted a C$504,000 surplus for the 2005-06 season, the company announced this week.

The National Ballet will soon take the stage in its new home, Toronto's Four Seasons Centre: the company inaugurates its season on November 9 with a refurbished production of Rudolf Nureyev's classic staging of The Sleeping Beauty.

The company's fiscal revenues for the past season were C$21,759,000; expenses amounted to C$21,255,000, resulting in the surplus. The National Ballet does have an accumulated deficit, however, which stands at C$636,000. Forty-seven percent of the 2005-06 revenues came from the box office, 24 percent from fundraising, 25 percent from government grants and 4 percent from unspecified income.

David Banks, board chair of the National Ballet of Canada, said, "I am extremely pleased to announce that the 2005-06 season was both an artistic and financial success. The year was Karen Kain's first as artistic director and was excellent. It marked the last year in the Hummingbird Centre, the company's home since 1964 ... The surplus we are able to post this year nearly halves the cumulative deficit."

The company had 260 performances and outreach events last season with a total attendance of 255,269. There were 67 performances at the Hummingbird and one performance at the Four Seasons Centre. The company toured to 6 cities in western Canada and to Washington, Cleveland and Ottawa, with 27 performances and a total attendance of 45,041.

Karen Kain's impact on the company in her new role has already been recognized: the studio/dance rehearsal space in the Four Seasons Centre will be named the Karen Kain Dance Studio in her honor. The anonymous donor who funded the studio said, "The naming of the dance studio seemed to be the perfect way to recognize what Karen Kain has done for the arts in Canada, particularly in her outstanding work with The National Ballet of Canada. Her status as an international symbol of Canadian culture is unquestioned and it was important for her to be recognized in a tangible way."


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