Owner of Original Film to Attend Debbie Does Dallas Premiere

News   Owner of Original Film to Attend Debbie Does Dallas Premiere Rudy Sutton, who, as president of VCX, owns the rights to the famous blue movie that inspired the current stage show, Debbie Does Dallas, will attend the Off Broadway premiere of the play on Oct. 29, its opening night, said Susan L. Schwartz.

Rudy Sutton, who, as president of VCX, owns the rights to the famous blue movie that inspired the current stage show, Debbie Does Dallas, will attend the Off Broadway premiere of the play on Oct. 29, its opening night, said Susan L. Schwartz.

Schwartz, the force behind the original New York International Fringe Festival show which led to the Off Broadway play, has developed a phone relationship with Sutton over the past couple years, but will meet the man for the first time at the premiere.

For a legitimate theatre artist, the producer-adapter-star is becoming fairly well known in pornography circles. She was recently invited by Bob Burge, another executive at VCX, to attend a X-rated movie convention in Atlantic City. "He looked just like I expected he would," said Schwartz. "Sort of like Brian Dennehy, with a really low voice."

The convention also afforded Schwartz the chance to meet such adult film stars of Ron Jeremy and Jamie Gillis, the man who inspired the Burt Reynolds character in "Boogie Nights."

"But mainly it was a lot of ladies signing pictures," said Schwartz. "There were long lines of guys ready to meet these ladies." A third VCX man, Harry Young, was all set to attend the original Fringe show when he suddenly died of a heart attack right before the opening.

Of the Off-Broadway show—which is produced by the Araca Group and features current adapter-director Erica Schmidt's work—Schwartz said, "I think it's fantastic. I couldn't be happier. Erica's done an amazing job with it. The songs are so funny. Every night I laugh."

Schwartz said she is currently co-writing on a new play with a friend, in which the two will star. She declined to elaborate, but said it may reach the Off-Broadway stage next spring.

—By Robert Simonson