Pulitzer-Winning Playwrights Will Make Broadway Debuts This Season

News   Pulitzer-Winning Playwrights Will Make Broadway Debuts This Season
 
Two influential female voices in the American theatre will stand out in a Broadway season dominated by male playwrights.
Paula Vogel and Lynn Nottage
Paula Vogel and Lynn Nottage Joseph Marzullo/WENN, Monica Simoes

As of December 5, Broadway’s 2016–2017 season includes a total of 45 productions, among them 21 plays. Out of that number, only three are written by women—and one is a revival of the late Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes.

The two other plays are Indecent by Paula Vogel and Lynn Nottage’s Sweat, both of which will transfer to Broadway this spring after acclaimed Off-Broadway runs. The productions will mark the Broadway debuts of the two established playwrights, whose work has earned them recognition Off-Broadway and at premier regional theatres across the U.S. for several decades.

Both Nottage and Vogel have earned the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for their work: Vogel in 1998 for How I Learned to Drive, a heartbreaking and disturbing examination of a young woman's relationship with an uncle who sexually abuses her; and Nottage in 2009 for Ruined, a play that charted the chaotic and hopeful lives of women amid the chaos of the civil war in Africa's Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Nottage’s Sweat will bow at Broadway’s Studio 54 March 4, 2017, prior to a March 26 opening. A personal and political drama exploring America's industrial decline, Sweat is currently playing an extended run at the Public Theater.

Vogel’s Indecent, a play with music about an ahead-of-its-time lesbian play produced in the 1920s, will begin previews in April at the Cort Theatre. Co-created with Rebecca Taichman, it played an Off-Broadway run at the Vineyard Theatre in spring 2016.

It is also worth noting that both plays are directed by women, with Kate Whoriskey at the helm of Sweat, and Taichman directing Indecent.

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