Rare B&W R&H "Cinderella" Screenings Given At L.A. & NYC Museums, To Dec. 31

News   Rare B&W R&H "Cinderella" Screenings Given At L.A. & NYC Museums, To Dec. 31
 
The New York City and Los Angeles branches of the Museum of Television and Radio will allow Rodgers and Hammerstein fans sit in their "own little corner" this holiday season to view rare black and white kinescopes of R&H's 1957 TV musical, "Cinderella," starring Julie Andrews.

The New York City and Los Angeles branches of the Museum of Television and Radio will allow Rodgers and Hammerstein fans sit in their "own little corner" this holiday season to view rare black and white kinescopes of R&H's 1957 TV musical, "Cinderella," starring Julie Andrews.

At the Manhattan museum, 25 W. 52nd St., screenings are 2 PM and 4 PM Tuesdays-Sundays and 6 PM Thursdays-Fridays through Dec. 31. Call (212) 621-6800.

The L.A. Museum, at 465 N. Beverly Dr. in Beverly Hills, screens 2:30 PM and 2:30 PM Wednesdays-Sundays and 6:30 PM Thursdays through Dec. 31. Call (310) 786-1025.

The New York museum also offers a gallery exhibit of original costume sketches from the production.

R&H's "Cinderella" was later remade and videotaped starring Lesley Ann Warren and Stuart Damon, a production that was aired annually, and remade again in 1998 starring Brandy in a multi-cultural "Wonderful World of Disney" adaptation, which interpolated other Rodgers songs. Andrews, fresh from success with My Fair Lady, sang the then-new R&H score that included "In My Own Little Corner," "Impossible/It's Possible," "Ten Minutes Ago" and "A Lovely Night." It was their only original TV musical.

Dorothy Stickney played the Queens, Kaye Ballard and Alice Ghostley were the stepsisters, Howard Lindsay was the King and John Cypher the Prince. It was choreographed by Jonathan Lucas, directed by Ralph Nelson and produced by Richard Lewine.

It aired as a live telecast March 31,1957 on CBS. A "kinescope" is a film document of the studio monitor. Surviving kinescopes are in black and white, although the east coast transmission was in color.

The later west coast airing was on black and white videotape because color videotape was not yet available to the networks, according to a museum statement.

-- By Kenneth Jones

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