Real Estate Men Sell: Glengarry Extends at Steppenwolf to Jan. 27

News   Real Estate Men Sell: Glengarry Extends at Steppenwolf to Jan. 27 "Always be closing" is the motto of the ruthless real estate men in David Mamet's Glengarry Glen Ross, currently being given the grand treatment in his hometown of Chicago. But, apparently, the folks at Steppenwolf Theatre Company don't subscribe to that philosophy, for they have just put off the closing of the play by one week; Glengarry has extended to Jan. 27. The show, which began on Nov. 23, was to have run through Jan. 19, 2002. The official opening of Dec. 2 brought warm reviews.

"Always be closing" is the motto of the ruthless real estate men in David Mamet's Glengarry Glen Ross, currently being given the grand treatment in his hometown of Chicago. But, apparently, the folks at Steppenwolf Theatre Company don't subscribe to that philosophy, for they have just put off the closing of the play by one week; Glengarry has extended to Jan. 27. The show, which began on Nov. 23, was to have run through Jan. 19, 2002. The official opening of Dec. 2 brought warm reviews.

Mamet first made his name in the Second City—where his frequent home was not Steppenwolf, but the Goodman Theatre—before impressing New York with such early works as Sexual Perversity in Chicago and American Buffalo. Glengarry, the quintessential Mamet work, came in 1984 and won the author the Pulitzer Prize. The staccato drama, told in three short scenes in a Chinese restaurant and one long act in a real estate office, illustrates the underside of the American Dream as expressed through the lives of seven desperate real estate brokers whose motto is "Always Be Closing."

Amy Morton will direct the all-male cast, featuring old Mamet hand Mike Nussbaum, Steppenwolf ensemble member Alan Wilder, Gary Brichetto, Peter Burns, Matt DeCaro, Tracy Letts and David Pasquesi.

Nussbaum plays the central role of hapless, aging agent, Shelley "The Machine" Levine. In the U.S premiere of the play, Nussbaum played the smaller role of Aaronow. Pasquesi plays the role of hot shot salesman Roma, the part that launched the career of Joe Mantegna.

For more information, call (312) 335-1888. —By Robert Simonson