Scholarship and March 3 Memorial for NYU Dramatist Herndon Planned

News   Scholarship and March 3 Memorial for NYU Dramatist Herndon Planned Venable Herndon, the late playwright, biographer and screenwriter who taught in New York University's dramatic writing program, will be remembered at a memorial 5:30 PM March 3.

Venable Herndon, the late playwright, biographer and screenwriter who taught in New York University's dramatic writing program, will be remembered at a memorial 5:30 PM March 3.

Herndon died Dec. 8, 1999, in Manhattan. He was 72 and the cause of death was acute leukemia.

NYU's Tisch School of the Arts' dramatic writing program is planning the memorial with Herndon's wife, Sharon Anson. The memorial will take place in the Cantor Film Center at 36 E. Broadway (between University and Greene), to be followed by a reception in the Common Room on the first floor of 721 Broadway (at Waverly).

The school has established the Venable Herndon Scholarship Fund. Donations can be sent to NYU Tisch School of the Arts, 721 Broadway, 12th Floor, New York NY 10003, Attn: Donna Consolini.

* An associate professor of screenwriting in NYU's Tisch School of the Arts, Herndon earned his bachelor's in French literature at Princeton and his master of fine arts in comparative at Harvard, and penned such plays as Until the Monkey Comes... (staged in New York, Chicago and Berlin), Bag of Flies and Independence Night.

His screenplays include "Alice's Restaurant" (directed by Arthur Penn), "Too Far to Walk" (for Otto Preminger), "Uncle Sam's Wild West Show" (for Paul Mazursky) and more.

"He came here originally to teach in the film school, which he started doing in 1975," said Mark Dickerman, chair of the NYU Tisch dramatic writing program. "He was always considered a screenwriting teacher, though he certainly had intense and important relationships with playwrights. He was a terrific dramaturg, and students sought him out. Venable would say things aloud that most human being don't. He was always controversial, provocative and outrageous."

Both playwrights and screenwriters would make the trek to Herndon's NYU office (the door always was open) for advice about work, Dickerman told Playbill On-Line.

"He was very blunt, but he had such affection for the person whose work he was talking about that as blunt as he became people never objected," Dickerman said. "Venable got people to think in vital ways about themselves, which he thought was important if they were going to be good writers. He became a habit for people. Once you were Venable-ized, that was it."

In addition to his dramatic writing, Herndon was founder and editor of the literary journal, "Chelsea Review" (1958-1966) and penned a biography, "James Dean: A Short Life."

He is survived by wife Sharon Anson and daughter Isabelle Molinaro of Manhattan.

-- By Kenneth Jones