Sept. 11 Schedule for Broadway Shows

News   Sept. 11 Schedule for Broadway Shows The horrendous events of Sept. 11, 2001, impelled Broadway producers to cancel performances of their shows for that evening. On this year's first anniversary of the terrorist attacks, many of those same productions, as well as some new ones, will voluntarily go dark.

The horrendous events of Sept. 11, 2001, impelled Broadway producers to cancel performances of their shows for that evening. On this year's first anniversary of the terrorist attacks, many of those same productions, as well as some new ones, will voluntarily go dark.

Because the date falls on a Wednesday this year, that will mean matinees as well as evening shows will be eliminated.

Many of the Broadway shows will schedule performances on another day to make up for the lost show. In addition, several Off-Broadway shows will be dark on Sept. 11.

As of Sept. 9, the following Broadway productions will not perform on Sept. 11, according to the League of American Theatres and Producers:

Show Sept. 11/02 Perfs Added
42nd Street Dark Monday 9/9: 8pm
Aida Dark Monday 9/9: 8pm,
Sunday 9/15: 7:30pm
Beauty & Beast Dark Monday 9/9: 8pm,
Tuesday 9/10: 8pm
Chicago Dark Monday 9/9: 8pm
Frankie and Johnny Dark Monday 9/9: 8pm,
Sunday 9/15: 8pm
The Graduate 2pm canceled
Into the Woods Dark Monday 9/9: 8pm
Les Miserables Dark Sunday 9/15: 3pm, 8pm
The Lion King Dark Tuesday 9/10: 8pm,
Thursday 9/12: 2pm
Mamma Mia! Dark Monday 9/9: 8pm,
Sunday 9/15: 8pm
Oklahoma! Dark (start of fall schedule)
The Phantom of the Opera Dark Sunday 9/15: 3pm, 8pm
Urinetown Dark Monday 9/9: 8pm

Cabaret and Rent do not present Wednesday shows and will be dark as usual. The Goat is on hiatus until Sept. 12.

Press spokesman Chris Boneau, whose firm Boneau/Bryan-Brown represents the Disney shows, as well as Frankie and Johnny, Cabaret, Urinetown, 42nd Street and Mamma Mia!, said "All of them are doing it out or respect. From the Disney standpoint, the move is in anticipation of memorials and events that will likely happen on that day."

Another reason fueling producers' decision to shut their doors on Sept. 11 may be the fact that few tickets are reportedly being sold for performances on that date.

— By Robert Simonson and David Gewirtzman