TACT Plans "Arthur Miller and the Holocaust," an Evening Illuminating Incident at Vichy

News   TACT Plans "Arthur Miller and the Holocaust," an Evening Illuminating Incident at Vichy The Actors Company Theatre/TACT, the critically-acclaimed company dedicated to presenting neglected or rarely produced plays of literary merit, will re-introduce New York City audiences to Arthur Miller's Incident at Vichy in March, but gets an early start on Feb. 18 with a sneak-peek presentation at Barnes and Noble at Broadway and 82nd Street.

"Arthur Miller and the Holocaust," a special evening of drama and prose, will focus on Miller's 1964 drama, Incident at Vichy, exploring "Miller's perspective and insight into the Holocaust."

Reading excerpts from Miller's work (including his early novel, "Focus") and performing scenes from the drama will be members of the company. The evening will include a Q&A session with the artists and the director, Scott Alan Evans.

Performances of Incident at Vichy begin at The Beckett Theatre (410 W. 42nd Street between 9th & 10th Avenues) on March 8. Opening night is March 16 at 7:30 PM. Performances will continue through April 11.

Wednesday, February 18th at 7 PM, at Barnes & Noble (2289 Broadway @ 82nd Street). For more information, please call (212) 362-8835. The event is free.

* The cast of Incident at Vichy includes TACT company members Jamie Bennett, Richard Ferrone, Todd Gearhart, Jack Koenig, Ron McClary, James Prendergast and Gregory Salata, plus guest artists Mark Alhadeff, Christopher Burns, Jeffrey Hawkins, Leif Huckman, Russell Kahn, Michael Oberholtzer and Dan Stowell.

"A detention room in France during the German occupation is the setting for America's preeminent playwright to explore the themes of guilt and complicity with the forces of authority," according to TACT. "In Incident at Vichy, ten men have been picked up for 'questioning.' As the men grapple with the fears, uncertainty and self-denial about the unspeakable fate that awaits them, Miller uniquely examines an historical period whose consequences continue to reverberate today."

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