The Future Is Now: Kopit's Y2K, From MTC, Opens Dec. 7 at Lortel

News   The Future Is Now: Kopit's Y2K, From MTC, Opens Dec. 7 at Lortel An angry young computer hacker invades the lives of an affluent New York couple in Arthur Kopit's modern urban thriller, Y2K, opening Dec. 7 at the Lucille Lortel Theatre in Greenwich Village.
James Naughton, Patricia Kalember and Erik Jensen.
James Naughton, Patricia Kalember and Erik Jensen. (Photo by Photo by Joan Marcus)

An angry young computer hacker invades the lives of an affluent New York couple in Arthur Kopit's modern urban thriller, Y2K, opening Dec. 7 at the Lucille Lortel Theatre in Greenwich Village.

The Manhattan Theatre Club staging stars James Naughton (Chicago) and Patricia Kalember (TV's "Sisters") as victims of a benevolent hacker linked to their past. Erik Jensen, of MTC's Corpus Christi, plays the e-terrorist. David Brown Jr. and Armand Schultz play investigators.

The title refers, of course, to the year 2000, and all the menacing changes the term suggests.

Rehearsals began Oct. 12 under Bob Balaban's direction. Previews for the open-ended run began Nov. 9.

The play is performed without an intermission. *

As an actor, Balaban recently played the title role of Mr. Happiness at New York City's Atlantic Theatre Company. He also staged Vick's Boy in Manhattan for Rattlestick Productions.

The Lortel is at 121 Christopher Street. MTC's Stage I and Stage II are currently occupied by An Experiment With an Air Pump and Fuddy Meers, respectively.

Y2K designers are Loy Arcenas (set), Tom Broecker (costumes), Kevin Adams (lighting) and Darron L. West (sound).

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Critics from around the country embraced Y2K in its March 1999 premiere at the Humana Festival of New American Plays in Kentucky, where it ran 75 minutes.

Kopit's works for the stage include Oh Dad, Poor Dad, Mamma's Hung You in the Closet and I'm Feelin' So Sad, Wings, Indians, Road to Nirvana, Nine, High Society and the Maury Yeston collaboration, Phantom.

Naughton is the Tony Award-winner who starred in City of Angels and Chicago, and Kalember starred in TV's "Sisters" and "thirtysomething."

Although not playing at MTC's City Center location in Manhattan, Y2K is technically part of MTC's Stage I season, which also includes the American premiere of Shelagh Stephenson's London hit, An Experiment With an Air Pump; the world premiere of composer lyricist-librettist Andrew Lippa's musical, The Wild Party, based on the 1928 Jazz Age narrative poem by Joseph Moncure March, beginning Jan. 25, 2000; and Proof, by American writer David Auburn, about a mysterious young woman who faces the death of a genius father, an unexpected suitor and a mysterious mathematical proof, beginning May 2, 2000.

For MTC information, call (212) 399-3030.

-- By Kenneth Jones