Today In Theatre History: NOVEMBER 17

News   Today In Theatre History: NOVEMBER 17 1902 American novelist Winston Churchill (no relation) turns his best-selling story, "The Crisis," into a four-act play. James K Hackett stars, directs, and produces at Wallack's in NYC.

1902 American novelist Winston Churchill (no relation) turns his best-selling story, "The Crisis," into a four-act play. James K Hackett stars, directs, and produces at Wallack's in NYC.

1930 Things are Sweet and Low for Fanny Brice in this show, produced and composed by her husband Billy Rose. Arthur Treacher and George Jessel are also in the cast.

1960 Advise and Consent, Allen Drury's political best seller, is adapted for the stage by Loring Mandel. Franklin Schaffner directs a cast that includes Ed Begley, Richard Kiley, Kevin McCarthy and Barnard Hughes.

1962 Sid Caesar stars in Little Me, a parody of an ambitious poor girl's memoirs by Patrick Dennis, adapted for the stage by Neil Simon. Songs are by Cy Coleman and Carolyn Leigh. Virginia Martin and Nancy Andrews are part of the cast dancing to Bob Fosse's choreography. The show runs 257 performances. The Roundabout Theatre revives Little Me in 1998 with Martin Short and Faith Prince in featured roles.

1991 The wide-eyed, blue-faced madness begins tonight as The Blue Man Group: Tubes opens tonight at the Astor Place Theatre. The show features stunts, comic skits, and loud music of the Blue Man's own creation. Described by Variety as "Mummenschanz on acid," the show draws wide acclaim and sold-out audiences. Now with shows going on in Boston, Chicago and Las Vegas, they are still going strong on Astor Place. 1994 Glenn Close gets rave reviews in Sunset Boulevard, the new Andrew Lloyd Webber musical opening tonight at the Minskoff Theatre. She plays the forgotten movie star Norma Desmond as she lives her later life. Alan Campbell plays the writer who takes a very unlucky turn into her life, with George Hearn playing her manservant. The show will close in 1997 after 977 performances, owing to the expense of running the show and a lack of performers who can handle the demands of the role of Norma Desmond.

-- By Sam Maher, Steve Luber and Anne Bradley