Winners Announced for 1997 Off-Off-Broadway Awards

News   Winners Announced for 1997 Off-Off-Broadway Awards
 
The Third Annual OOBR Awards (for Off-Off-Broadway excellence) have been announced, with the awards ceremony set for July 7.

The Third Annual OOBR Awards (for Off-Off-Broadway excellence) have been announced, with the awards ceremony set for July 7.

The awards came out of OOBR magazine, founded by editor and publisher John Chatterton. "These awards were designed not as a competition," says Chatterton, "but rather a celebration. A way to honor struggling artists Off-Off-Broadway. There should be a way to recognize those artists who work for no money, have to balance their career witha day job, and work under sometimes less-than-perfect conditions, all because they love the theatre."

Similar to the Village Voice Obies, OOBies have no nominees or balloting/selection process to determine the winners. Instead, each OOBR critic chooses his favorite show from those reviewed over the past season. Additionally, two special OOBRs are given for "sustained excellence."

Tickets to the third annual ceremony are only $17 and available at (212) 691-2014. The 7 PM event takes place at NY's Cherry Lane Theatre (38 Commerce St.), with catering by Katz's Delicatessen. A "networking party" takes place after the hour-long ceremony.

Critics making the selections were Chatterton, Dudley Stone, John Attanas, Richard Willett, Adrienne Onofri, Marshall Yaeger, John Koroly, Here are the 1997 OOBR Award Winners:
The Way of the World, by William Congreve, Blue Coat Repertory.
Night Of Nave, by Bill Have, 29th Street Repertory.
The Godsend, by Richard Willett, IRT New Directions.
Sex Toys And Subway Stories, by Kirsten Ames, Womenkind VII/Cosmic Leopard Productions.
Don't Let Destiny Push You Around / Can't Cut My Head Off, John Montgomery Theatre Company.
Donkey Bar, by John Coyle, Last Call Productions.
Medea, by Euripides, North Star Productions. Special Award: Westside Repertory Company for sustained excellence Off-Off-Broadway.
Special Award: Jerry Tallmer, theatre critic who helped found the Village Voice. He also worked for the New York Post and now writes for the New York Weekly and The Villager.

--By David Lefkowitz

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