DIVA TALK: Glory Crampton, Leslie Kritzer, Julie Reiber, Josefina Scaglione, Natalie Toro and Rachel York's NYMF Chats

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13 Jul 2012

Glory Crampton
Glory Crampton

News, views and reviews about the multi-talented women of the musical theatre and the concert/cabaret stage.

This week spotlights six more women who are featured in the 2012 New York Musical Theatre Festival, which runs through July 29 at various venues around the city. Diva Talk posed the same set of questions to each talented artist; their answers follow.

(To read last week's interviews with Catherine Cox, Michelle Federer, Anika Larsen, J. Elaine Marcos, Sheryl Lee Ralph and Melissa van der Schyff, click here.)

Glory Crampton
Foreverman at the PTC Performance Space
July 24-26

How did you get involved with this production?
Glory Crampton: I got a call from my manager for an audition for the project.



What other NYMF productions have you been a part of?
GC: This is my first.

How would you describe the character you're playing?
GC: Anna is humorous, determined and loving. She knows she is dying, and is trying to make sure the people she loves are ready for her to go, and taken care of....both emotionally and financially.

Why do you think audiences should attend this particular production?
GC: I think there are many themes in this show people can relate to. Understanding the cycle of life, living the best life you can, loving unconditionally, forgiveness, making choices we regret, consequences of having others make decisions for us, testing fate, love that is much bigger than us…

Why do you think NYMF is so important?
GC: I think it is important that we always celebrate new writers, and NYMF gives so many people the chance to work on, and see what they have envisioned come to life onstage. It gives them the chance they may not otherwise have had to have their work seen and heard. There is something about this process that is so gratifying for me as an actress to know that I am helping with that process. It's different than doing a show that is already being fully produced..... so much of the writers hearts are invested here, you can feel the excitement in the room.

NYMF celebrates new musicals, but which role in a classic musical would you most like to perform?
GC: Hmmm? I don't know, but a role that is smart, mischievous, sexy, spirited and funny. Any suggestions?

Do you have any other projects in the works?
GC: I am in negotiations right now for something, which I can't mention yet... I recently did a Mufti musical called The Game of Love at The York Theatre by Tom Jones & Nancy Ford. I have a lot of concerts booked for my one-woman show I am touring with, which is based on my new CD "Unusual Way" which was recorded with the National Symphony. I was also a part of the cast of Death Takes a Holiday at The Roundabout, which just received 11 Drama Desk nominations.

Leslie Kritzer

Leslie Kritzer
A Letter to Harvey Milk at the Pershing Square Signature Center
July 23-28

How did you get involved with this production?
Leslie Kritzer: I have been working on this show for a few years now. Ellen Schwartz had asked me to do a reading of another show of hers for the Fringe festival back in 2002, and we have been friends ever since. When this show came about, she thought I would be perfect for the part and wanted me to do it.

What other NYMF productions have you been a part of?
LK: Judas and Me.

How would you describe the character you're playing?
LK: I play a Jewish lesbian writing teacher. She is warm, funny and wants to know more about her past including her hero, Harvey Milk.

Why do you think audiences should attend this particular production?
LK: I think there have been a lot of things written about Harvey Milk, but this is completely different. It's not just about him. It's about friendship between two people that under normal circumstances would probably never meet and create the bond that they do. Harvey Milk is part of the bond that brings them together. In doing so they uncover things about themselves.

Why do you think NYMF is so important?
LK: I think it's a great way for new writers to get their work seen. It's difficult to get musicals produced unless it's a big commercial show. This allows writers to show their work and have audiences come and enjoy it without it necessarily having the pressure of a major production. Then they can see where the show is at, continue to work on it and then hopefully get future productions of it done.

NYMF celebrates new musicals, but which role in a classic musical would you most like to perform?
LK: Well, there are a few, but the first one that jumps out is Fanny Brice in Funny Girl and Dot in Sunday in the Park with George.

Do you have any other projects in the works?
LK: I'm doing my Jule Styne concert Hello Gorgeous up at Barrington Stage Company July 30. Come and see me!!!

Read more about Leslie Kritzer at the Playbill Vault.

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