THEIR FAVORITE THINGS: Hands on a Hardbody Lyricist-Composer Amanda Green Shares Her Theatregoing Experiences

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20 Mar 2013

Amanda Green
Amanda Green
Photo by Joseph Marzullo/WENN

Their Favorite Things asks members of the theatre community to share the Broadway performances that most affected them as part of the audience.

This week we spotlight the choices of Hands on a Hardbody's Amanda Green, the lyricist and co-composer (with Trey Anastasio) of that new Broadway musical, which is currently playing the Brooks Atkinson Theatre.

(Clicking on a name bolded in blue will take readers to that actor or show's entry in the Playbill Vault.)

 

Peter Brook's A Midsummer Night's Dream

 

"I was five years old. I don't remember much, but I was transfixed. I remember for the finale everyone whirring these noise-making plastic tubes over their heads – it was so joyous and electric."

 

 

Two Gentlemen of Verona

 

"Such a joyous, sexy, fun rock musical! Raul Julia singing 'Calla Lilly Lady.' I was seven years old, and I was in love. In that way. My friends and I wore this record out, too."

 

Pacific Overtures

 

"I was eight or nine. I was obsessed with the song 'Chrysanthemum Tea.' I wore the record out memorizing it. It made me want to be a lyricist."

Barry Humphries

 

"My parents took my brother and me to a performance of his when we were kids. He did an afternoon of Dame Edna, as well as a filthy drunk Emcee with a large pee stain. I had never seen anything like it. He was playing in a tiny theatre, and when he hurled those gladioli as weapons I couldn't breathe from laughing."

 

 

A Party With Betty Comden & Adolph Green at the Morosco Theater

 

"I never ceased to be amazed, delighted, moved and inspired by my father and Betty's brilliance, not only as songwriters but also as performers. Their ability to entertain with so much joy, brio – and never a false note."

 

 

On the Twentieth Century

 

"Kevin Kline as Bruce Granite – and his inspired 'bit,' which got longer and longer and more and more involved as the show's run went on – of 'fainting' at the sight of Lily Garland (Madeline Kahn and then Judy Kaye) entering their compartment in a satin negligee."

 

A Chorus Line

 

"I saw the original company as a kid. I was blown away. I knew I was seeing something new, real and contemporary in theatre. Songs and subjects and characters that I had never heard, and certainly never heard sung about."

 

 

Sweeney Todd

 

"My all-time favorite musical. The version for me is and will always be Hal Prince's original production. That beehive drop cloth of English society. Len Cariou, Angela Lansbury, Victor Garber! Lonny Price's magnificent concert version was also seminal – with a magnificent George Hearn, Patti LuPone, Audra McDonald and Neil Patrick Harris.

I have seen four different productions of it, as well as the film version – which I’m sure sets no record, but still. I memorized it growing up, and my stepdaughters were weaned on it. I remember them drawing crayon stick figure Mrs. Lovetts and Sweeney and his razor – which I sent to Steve Sondheim."

Follies: In Concert

 

"Mandy Patinkin singing 'Buddy's Blues' – his fury and showmanship and humor – and the anger and funniness of the song was electrifying. As a performer and songwriter, it still inspires me – to get that much emotion in a song – I love that combustible combination of emotion and humor."


She Loves Me

 

"The revival at The Roundabout... The perfect musical. One to which I will always aspire. Judy Kuhn singing 'Vanilla Ice Cream.'"


A Little Night Music revival

 

"A reminder of how brilliant, smart, witty and emotional musical theatre can be. Perfect. Why we do it."

 

The Further Adventures of Hedda Gabler 

 

"...By Jeff Whitty, produced by the maverick theatre company, Exit Pursued By A Bear. The most satisfying evening of theatre I've had in ages. It took place in the artistic director's loft; the audience sat cross-legged or sprawled on cushions. The play was brilliant, wildly inventive, ingeniously staged and superbly acted by Jeff Whitty in the titular role, Billy Porter as the character of Mammy from 'Gone With The Wind' and a superb company. At the interval, the actors and company members served the audience a delicious vegetable stew and fresh bread. It was joyous, smart, celebratory - a total evening of theatre and theatre making."