"The King's Speech," Based on an Unproduced Play, Secures Big Wins in Three Sets of British Film Awards

By Mark Shenton
14 Feb 2011

"The King's Speech," Based on an Unproduced Play, Secures Big Wins in Three Sets of British Film Awards

"The King's Speech," the hit British film based on an unproduced play about the speech impediment suffered by King George VI, has won seven BAFTAS -- the U.K. equivalent of the Oscar, presented in a ceremony at London's Royal Opera House Feb. 13 -- including being named Best Film and Best British Film. 

Colin Firth, playing the lead role, was named Best Actor, an accolade he also received in the Evening Standard's British Film Awards, presented Feb. 7, and the London Film Critics' Circle Awards, presented Feb. 10.

"The King's Speech" was, however,  do not receive the top prize of Best Film at either of those awards ceremonies: "Neds," a low-budget feature set amongst Glasgow's gang culture,  was named Best Film in the Standard Award, and "The Social Network" won the Critics' prize for Film of the Year.

Aaron Sorkin won the BAFTA for adapted screenplay for "The Social Network," and also won the Critics' Circle prize for screenwriter of the year. Andrew Garfield, the stage actor turned screen star who is currently starring in the new film version of "Spider-man" (unrelated to the troubled Broadway musical), won the Standard Award for Best  Actor his performance in "The Social Network" and "Never Let Me Go," as well as the Critics' Circle Award for Best supporting actor for "The Social Network."



London stage stalwart Roger Allam won the Standard's Peter Sellers Award for Comedy for his performance in "Tamara Drewe." Other performance awards went to Annette Bening (Critics' Circle Award for Actress of the Year for "The Kids Are Alright"), Lesley Manville (Critics' Circle Award for British actress for "Another Year"), Olivia Williams (Critics' Circle Award for British supporting actress for "The Ghost"), Kristin Scott Thomas (Evening Standard Award for Best Actress for "Leaving"), Natalie Portman (BAFTA for Best Actress for "Black Swan"), Geoffrey Rush (BAFTA for Supporting Actor for "The King's Speech") and Helena Bonham Carter (BAFTA for Supporting Actress for "The King's Speech").