Richard Nelson's Apple Family Will Talk Politics a Bit Longer; Sorry Extends Again at the Public

By Adam Hetrick
19 Nov 2012

Jay O. Sanders and Laila Robins
Jay O. Sanders and Laila Robins
Photo by Joan Marcus

The Public Theater has announced a second extension for Richard Nelson's acclaimed drama Sorry, which revisits the Apple Family of Rhinebeck, NY, on Election Day 2012.

Tony Award winner Nelson (James Joyce's The Dead) brings back the Apple family from his plays Sweet and Sad and That Hopey Changey Thing for the world premiere of his play that began previews Nov. 3 and officially opened Nov. 6 as part of the Public Lab. It first extended through Nov. 25 and will now play an additional week to Dec. 2. Remaining tickets for the extension are now $30.

The drama takes place the morning of the election as Americans head to the polls to cast their votes. Nelson has been updating the script to reflect recent developments in the country and the campaigns.

Sorry reunites original cast members from the first two plays, including Jay O. Sanders and Maryann Plunkett, as well as Jon DeVries, Laila Robins and J. Smith-Cameron. Nelson directs.



According to the Public, "A year after Sweet and Sad, the Apple family again share a meal in Rhinebeck, as they sort through personal and political feelings of loss and confusion on the morning of the day the country will choose the next president. Like the first two plays, Sweet and Sad and That Hopey Changey Thing, Sorry opened on the day that it is set, November 6, 2012 — Election Day."

The production has scenic and costume design by Susan Hilferty, lighting design by Jennifer Tipton and sound design by Scott Lehrer and Will Pickens.

Nelson is the Tony Award-winning playwright/adaptor of James Joyce's The Dead. His works also include Two Shakespearean Actors, Farewell to the Theatre, Conversations in Tusculum, and Nikolai And The Others, which will debut Off-Broadway at Lincoln Center Theater's Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater in spring 2013. 

For tickets phone (212) 967-7555 or visit PublicTheater. The Public Theater is located at 425 Lafayette Street in Manhattan.