OFF-BROADWAY SPRING PREVIEW: Passion, Terrence McNally, The Last Five Years, Jesse Eisenberg, Neil LaBute, Edie Falco

By Robert Simonson
29 Dec 2012

Bill Irwin
Photo by Joseph Marzullo/WENN

Also in the offing this coming winter and spring: MCC Theater's Reasons to be Happy, Neil LaBute's sequel to reasons to be pretty, and Really Really, the New York premiere of Paul Downs Colaizzo’s play about the ugly gossip that threatens a group of undergrad friends the morning after a wild party, directed by David Cromera new Theatre for a New Audience staging of Much Ado About Nothing, beginning Feb. 2 at The Duke, with Jonathan Cake and Maggie Siff as the sparring lovers; The Dance and the Railroad, a revival of David Henry Hwang's drama about two Chinese workers on a California mountaintop near the Transcontinental Railroad in 1867, from Feb. 5 at the Signature Theatre Company; also at the Signature, from Feb. 12, Old Hats, in which Clowns Bill Irwin and David Shiner reunite to create a new work using music, technology, and movement; The Old Boy, a revival of A.R. Gurney's memory play set at a New England prep school, by the Keen Company, starting Feb. 12; the Public Theater premiere of Detroit '67, Dominique Morisseau's play, set in 1967 Detroit, about a brother and sister who turn their basement into an after-hours joint; the Barrow Street Theatre presentation of Hit the Wall, Ike Holter's rock-propelled drama about the birth of the gay rights movement outside New York City's Stonewall Inn (just blocks from the theatre) on June 27, 1969; The North Pool, the Vineyard Theatre's hosting of the New York premiere of Rajiv Joseph's thriller about a high school principal and a Middle Eastern-born transfer student who engage in a politically and emotionally charged game of cat and mouse, commencing in February; the English language premiere of a play by Guillermo Calderón (who also directs) about actress Olga Knipper, Anton Chekhov's widow, produced by the Public Theater from March 1; the Playwrights Horizons world premiere of Tanya Barfield's play The Call, about a couple that decides to adopt a child from Africa, beginning March 22; the Pearl Theatre Company presentation of Terrence McNally's new play, And Away We Go, which time-travels from ancient Athens to London's Globe Theatre, from Versailles's Royal Theater to the first reading of a new play by Chekhov, and to the American premiere of Waiting for Godot, directed by Jack Cummings III, starting April 19; a new Theatre for a New Audience production, starting April 21, of five short plays by Samuel Beckett; Bunny Berman Presents…, a New Group production of Ayub Khan Din and Paul Bogaev's musical set in a failing 1950s Bollywood studio, directed by Scott Elliott, beginning in April; Basilica, the Rattlestick Playwrights Theater mounting of a Mando Alvarado's play about the Catholic Church and Texas pride, from May 1; in April and May, Transport Group's The Memory Show — a new musical by Zach Redler and Sara Cooper, starring Catherine Cox and Leslie Kritzer — about a mother and daughter facing hardship and disease; and a revival of the Anita Loos comedy Happy Birthday, by the acclaimed TACT/The Actors Company Theatre, in March and April.