Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice Comment on School Master Who Commissioned Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

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29 Mar 2014

Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice have issued a joint statement on the late Alan Doggett, the music master at Colet Court, a school where he commissioned and staged the very first incarnation of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat as a 15-minute cantata in 1968.

Doggett, who committed suicide in 1978, has since been exposed as a serial abuser of young boys in his care. According to a report in the Daily Mail, "a string of former pupils [have come] forward to reveal how they were molested by the teacher. There was open gossip among the boys, apparently, that ‘half a crown’ was the ‘going rate for a session with Doggett.' This week, a string of former pupils came forward to reveal how they were molested by the teacher. There was open gossip among the boys, apparently, that ‘half a crown’ was the ‘going rate for a session with Doggett.'"

In their statement, LLoyd Webber and Tim RIce state, "Alan Doggett was the music master at Westminster Under School, where he taught Andrew's younger brother Julian.  He became a friend of the Lloyd Webber family when Andrew was twelve.

Doggett asked Andrew in 1967 whether he and Tim would write an end of term concert piece for the preparatory school Colet Court. The consequence was Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.

Doggett had a track record of success with schools music. His choir had recorded previously the Daniel Jazz and the Jonah Man Jazz which were considered successes in the schools music field in the mid 1960s.



At the time of his death we had not seen him for some time. His suicide in 1978 and the fresh allegations that were made around that time came as a complete shock to us.


Neither of us had ever heard of the Paedophile Information Exchange until very recently and obviously had no idea that Alan Doggett was connected with it or that he could be a danger to children."