Broadway Box-Office Analysis, May 12-18: Bridges of Madison County Goes Out With a Box-Office Bang

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20 May 2014

Playbill's newest weekly feature examines the box-office trends of the past week.



Numbers were up overall along the Great White Way this past week. Combined box office across the 36 remaining attractions totaled just over $30 million, about $1.25 million more than the previous week. Attendance, too, saw more than 10,000 extra theatregoers step up to the marquees. The season-to-date numbers stand at $1,237,950,006, which is more than $120 million over last year at this time.

All the Way, the Lyndon Johnson history play starring Bryan Cranston, which is culling a fair number of awards this spring, posted the best attendance marks. Crowds were well above capacity (106.18%), even if the box-office numbers were just 76% of the potential. As such, the play beat the usual record holder, The Book of Mormon.

But many shows enjoyed full houses this past week, including A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder (on a business roll ever since copping numerous Tony nominations a few weeks ago), A Raisin in the Sun, Aladdin, Beautiful and Hedwig and the Angry Inch. All of the above did well by the Tony nominations. (Just missing capacity were Kinky Boots, Of Mice and Men and Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill.)

The newly shined-up allure of those productions were arguably drawing business away from other, older shows that normally play at capacity or close to it. Pippin's houses were 84% full; Matilda the Musical sold 91% of its seats; and Newsies performances were at 85% capacity.

The Bridges of Madison County, the Jason Robert Brown musical that closed May 18, pulled in its best week ever, playing to auditoriums that were 98% filled. The drawing power of Daniel Radcliffe was proven somewhat weaker than expected, as The Cripple of Inishmaan (which got good reviews), was selling roundly three-quarters of its tickets and earned 58% of its possible box-office take.