LAST CHANCE: What's Closing This Week

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19 Feb 2014

Cherry Jones and Celia Keenan-Bolger
Cherry Jones and Celia Keenan-Bolger
Photo by Michael J. Lutch

Here's Playbill.com's weekly "Last Chance" reminder to catch Broadway, Off-Broadway and world-premiere productions before they take a final bow.

Concluding Feb. 23

The Glass Menagerie (Broadway at the Booth Theatre). Tony Award winner Cherry Jones, Tony nominee Celia Keenan-Bolger and Zachary Quinto inhabit the world of Tennessee Williams' The Glass Menagerie, staged by Tony Award winner John Tiffany. Here's how the production, which premiered at the American Repertory Theater to critical acclaim, is billed: "Amanda Wingfield (Jones) is a southern belle past her prime, living with two grown children in a small apartment in St. Louis. Amanda dreams of a better life for her shy and crippled daughter Laura (Keenan-Bolger), and so she pushes her son Tom (Quinto) to find a 'gentleman caller' for the girl. However, the arrival of the gentleman caller (Smith) sends shockwaves through the family, and causes cracks to form in the delicate fantasies that have kept them going. A beautiful play full of poetry and longing, The Glass Menagerie makes its triumphant return to Broadway in an exquisite and groundbreaking new production." Visit TheGlassMenagerieBroadway.com.



Stop Hitting Yourself (Off-Broadway at the Claire Tow Theater). The LCT3/Lincoln Center Theater world-premiere presentation of Stop Hitting Yourself — which was created by Rude Mechs, the Austin, TX-based theatre collective — features Thomas Graves, Heather Hanna, Joey Hood, Hannah Kenah, Lana Lesley, E. Jason Liebrecht and Paul Soileau. Here's how the 90-minute production is billed: "Part Pygmalion, part Busby Berkeley, part self-help lexicon, Stop Hitting Yourself borrows from the plots of 1930's musicals to dig deep into the contemporary conservative dilemma: how to honor steely individualism without disavowing the virtue of charity – all the while tap-dancing around a queso fountain Once a year, at the Charity Ball, a single worthy cause is chosen to benefit from the Queen's Annual Good Deed. Prominent families compete to find citizens deserving of assistance. This year, a Socialite has discovered a Wildman in the forest and tries to improve him. The Wildman’s desire to save the natural world and usher in an era of love and harmony is a sure-winner. Now the Socialite must teach him how to eat, dance and behave in society so that his cause can be victorious." Visit LCT.org.