PLAYBILL QUIZ: Tony Has Oscar Ties, Challenge Your Awards Knowledge! (The Answers)

Tony voters and Oscar voters are of two minds and two worlds, but sometimes these overlap. Last week Playbill.com shared a quiz with our readers that mixes award-winning shows with award-winning cinema.

Our readers know their Broadway trivia like nobody else, but when we turn the lens on the intersection of Broadway and Hollywood, does your knowledge hold up? Take a shot at these 25 questions and see where you fall. The initial quiz follows. Click to the second page to see the answers!

1. Who won 18 Oscar nominations (more than any other performer) and only one Tony nomination?

2. Who won 10 Tony nominations (more than any other performer) and only one Oscar nomination?

3. Who has lost the Tony for Funny Girl—but got the Oscar for it AND won the role that had defeated her for the Tony?

4. For Butterflies Are Free, who lost the Best Featured Actress Tony to her Broadway co-star but won the Best Supporting Actress Oscar for the movie version?

5. What two Tony-winning Best Plays won the Best Picture Oscar? (Their titles begin with the same three letters.)

6. What two Tony-winning Best Musicals won the Best Picture Oscar? (They did it back-to-back, too.)

7. What year did the Tony-winning Best Musical and the Oscar-winning Best Picture have the same title and tell the same story?

8. Who won Tonys for roles that won Oscars for Grace Kelly and Elizabeth Taylor?

9. What two-time Tony winner originated roles that won Oscars for Rita Moreno and Catherine Zeta-Jones?

10. The Broadway revival of what Tony-winning show features an Oscar-winning song that was written in-between for its movie version?

11. What Best Actor and Best Actress won Oscars in 1931-32 AND Tonys in 1947?

12. What two Gone With the Wind players—both Oscar winners in 1939—won Tonys for musicals?

13. Who won a Tony for the musicalization of her Oscar-winning performance?

14. Who won a Tony for the musicalization of her Oscar- nominated performance?

15. Who lost the Oscar to Audrey Hepburn three days after she lost to Tony to her?

16. Who had both of her Tony-winning roles played on the screen by Deborah Kerr?

17. From 1948 to 1956, who is the only Best Actress Oscar winner to win her Oscar for a non-stage role?

18. Other than the Oscar nomination, what else was singularly unique about the women contending for Best Actress of 1956?

19. What title player won a Tony as Joan of Lorraine and an Oscar nomination as "Joan of Arc?"

20. What two-time Tony winner has parents who received Oscars? (How-sweet-it-is postscript: She won her Oscar for a role she lost on Broadway.)

21. Who won a Tony AND an Oscar for a character who only existed in song sequences?

22. South Pacific is the only show to win Tonys in all four acting categories, yet only one of those performances was repeated on screen. Whose?

23. Who won the 1952 Best Featured Actor in a Musical Tony AND the 1956 Best Actor Oscar--for the same performance?

24. What two actors—one starring, one supporting--won their Tonys and their Oscars on the same nights?

25. Who won a Tony in 1965 playing a guy named Oscar and had a co-star in 1969 win an Oscar for playing a girl named Toni?
 

1. Meryl Streep (for 1976's A Memory of Two Mondays/ 27 Wagons Full of Cotton).

2. Julie Harris (for 1953's The Member of the Wedding, which, ironically and incredibly, is not one of the ten performances for which she was Tony-nominated).

3. Barbra Streisand, soon to be the movies' Dolly Levi instead of Tony-winning Carol Channing.

4. Eileen Heckart won the Oscar but lost the Tony to Blythe Danner.

5. 1966's A Man for All Seasons and 1984's Amadeus.

6. 1964's My Fair Lady and 1965's T he Sound of Music. 7. 1997's Titanic.

8. Uta Hagen: The Country Girl and Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

9. Chita Rivera: West Side Story and Chicago.

10. Evita's "You Must Love Me."

11. Fredric March for "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" and Years Ago; Helen Hayes for "The Sin of Madelon Claudet" and Happy Birthday. Both stars went on to win one more of each.

12. Vivien Leigh in 1963's Tovarich; Thomas Mitchell in 1953's Hazel Flagg.

13. Lila Kedrova for Zorba [the Greek].

14. Rosalind Russell for 1953's Wonderful Town (from 1942's "My Sister Eileen").

15. Deborah Kerr for "From Here to Eternity" and Tea and Sympathy.

16. Margaret Leighton of 1956's Separate Tables and 1962's The Night of the Iguana.

17. Audrey Hepburn in 1953's "Roman Holiday," interrupting the run of Jane Wyman in 1948's "Johnny Belinda," Olivia de Havilland in 1949's "The Heiress," Judy Holliday in 1950's "Born Yesterday," Vivien Leigh in 1951's "A Streetcar Named Desire," Shirley Booth in 1952's "Come Back, Little Sheba," Grace Kelly in 1954's "The Country Girl," Anna Magnani in 1955's "The Rose Tattoo" and Ingrid Bergman in 1956's "Anastasia."

18. All competed in stage roles: Ingrid Bergman in "Anastasia" (the winner!), Nancy Kelly in "The Bad Seed," Deborah Kerr in "The King and I," Katharine Hepburn in "The Rainmaker" and Carroll Baker in "Baby Doll" (nee 27 Wagons Full of Cotton).

19. Ingrid Bergman. (Both vehicles were written by Maxwell Anderson, Andrew Solt assisting on the screenplay).

20. Liza Minnelli, daughter of director Vincente Minnelli and Judy Garland.

21. Joel Grey in Cabaret.

22. Juanita Hall's Bloody Mary—and her on-screen singing was dubbed! (At the time, Hull was appearing on Broadway—and singing quite well—in another Rodgers and Hammerstein show, Flower Drum Song).

23. Yul Brynner as The King of Siam in The King and I.

24. Paul Scofield on Broadway in 1962 and on screen in 1966 both as A Man for All Seasons; Walter Matthau on Broadway in 1962's A Shot in the Dark and on screen in 1966's "The Fortune Cookie."

25. Walter Matthau in The Odd Couple and Goldie Hawn in "Cactus Flower."