THEIR FAVORITE THINGS: Two-Time Tony Nominee and In Masks Star Alison Fraser Shares Her Theatregoing Experiences

By Andrew Gans
May 3, 2012

Playbill.com's new feature series, Their Favorite Things, asks members of the theatre community to share ten of the Broadway performances that most affected them as part of the audience.

This week we spotlight the choices of two-time Tony nominee Alison Fraser, who is currently appearing Off-Broadway in the world premiere of Tennessee Williams' In Masks Outrageous and Austere.

Read more about Fraser's theatrical history in the Playbill Vault.



Twelve Angry Men - 2012 George Street Playhouse.

 

"David Saint's production of this old chestnut got me in a way that I haven't been grabbed theatrically in years. The emotional impact, the superb ensemble cast, and the surprising timeliness in light of the recent tragedy and subsequent verdict at Rutgers had me in tears five times. And, I'm not a crier."

Learn more about Twelve Angry Men at the Playbill Vault

 

 

The Lieutenant of Inishmore - Broadway, 2006. 

 

"When Wee Thomas re-surfaced? Sublime."

Read more about The Lieutenant of Inishmore at the Playbill Vault

 

Measure for Measure - with Mark Rylance BAM, 2006.

"The only time I have ever seen the great puzzle at the end of this play solved. Who would not want to marry Mr. Rylance’s Duke?"

Read more about Mark Rylance's theatrical history at the Playbill Vault.

Private Lives - Broadway, 2002

 

"Sexiest Amanda and Elyot ever. Lindsay Duncan wasn't afraid to show her masculine side, and Alan Rickman his feminine. And, to me, those who embrace both are by far the most attractive."

Read more about Private Lives at the Playbill Vault

 

 

The Wild Party - Broadway,  2000.

 

"At a tough time in my life financially, I saw it at full price after seeing the astonishing Tony Award broadcast, and then had to go again the next night to see if it was as amazing as I recalled it. It was. Maybe more so."

Read more about The Wild Party at the Playbill Vault.

 

 

Ubu Rock - American Repertory Theater, 1995

 

"Andre Belgrader's (pictured) hilarious, anarchic take on Jarry’s Ubu Roi, with a blistering rock score by Rusty Magee. 'The Limb Ballet,' in which body parts fell to the floor to a celestial theme, is one of the most shattering comments on the horror and senselessness of war I have ever encountered."

Read more about composer Rusty Magee at the Playbill Vault.

 

 

Red Scare on Sunset - Off-Broadway, 1991

"I fell in love with Charles Busch and Julie Halston after seeing this production. I also think it, in addition to being seriously funny, is an incredibly incisive attack on McCarthyism. Not to mention Method acting!"

Read more about Julie Halston's theatrical history at the Playbill Vault

 

 

 

Tamara - Seventh Regiment Armory, 1987. 

 

"The audience roamed around an armory dolled up as a 1930's Italian villa and got to choose which simultaneous character plot line to follow by going into various rooms. I wound up alone in a boudoir watching the shockingly committed Laura Esterman (pictured), playing Luisa, kill herself. I still get the willies thinking about it. I almost called for help." 

Read more about Laura Esterman's theatrical history at the Playbill Vault

 

The Taming of the Shrew - The Public Theater with Raul and Meryl Streep, 1978.

 

"This was my first Shakespeare in the Park experience. How lucky was I? The Kate and Petruchio of your dreams."

Read more about Meryl Streep's theatrical history at the Playbill Vault.

 

The Cherry Orchard - Lincoln Center 1977 with Raul Julia and Irene Worth. 

 

"I vividly remember the snow. I wonder if there was any? Hands down the best Chekhov production I have ever seen. Gosh, wasn’t Meryl Streep the maid?"

Read more about Irene Worth's theatrical career at the Playbill Vault. 

 

The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel - with Al Pacino at the Theatre Company of Boston, 1977.
 

 

"This, 35 years after the fact, remains indelible. Theatre at its very best."

Read more about Al Pacino's theatrical history at the Playbill Vault