THEIR FAVORITE THINGS: Five-Time Tony Nominee and The Castle Star Jan Maxwell Shares Her Theatregoing Experiences

By Andrew Gans
July 24, 2013

Playbill.com's new feature series, Their Favorite Things, asks members of the theatre community to share the Broadway performances that most affected them as part of the audience.

This week we spotlight the choices of singing actress and five-time Tony nominee Jan Maxwell, who is currently starring in the PTP/NYC production of Howard Barker's The Castle through Aug. 4 at The Atlantic Stage 2.



(Clicking on a name bolded in blue will take readers to that actor or show's entry in the Playbill Vault.)

 

The Wooster Group in L.S.D.

 

"Scintillating. Changed my life. Opened my mind to the vast possibilities of theatre. I felt crazy watching that show (in a good, excited way). Incredible. I loved it."

 

 

Rosalind Elias in Follies

 

"She was the personification of the word poignancy. Actually, I don't really know in my heart of hearts which I loved more - her performance or teaching her swear words and stage combat backstage during Act 1. (Btw, she was an excellent student.)"

 

 

Bill Camp in Coram Boy
 

 

"I got to see him up close and personal. He was wonderful in the role and open to anything and everything. I would burst out laughing many times during rehearsal; I was so giddy in my good fortune to be working with him."

The company of GATZ at the Performing Garage

 

"I was completely enthralled. The best of at least a decade."

 

 

Peter Friedman in Israel Horovitz's My Old Lady

 

"So astonishingly real in the role, it scared me." 

 

 

Anne Pitoniak in 'night, Mother  

 

"She ripped my heart out."

 

Joe Mantello, Ron Leibman and Jeffrey Wright in Angels in America

 

"Great writing, great acting. "

 

Martin Short in Martin Short: Fame Becomes Me

 

"Sorry, he just makes me laugh. Stupid, stupid fun."

Scott Wise in Jerome Robbins' Broadway

 

"I had never seen such an athletic and beautiful dancer. My heart soared with his every move."

 

 

Kathleen Chalfant in Wit
 

 

"It thrilled me that she played it as written: unsympathetically. Very rare and refreshing to see a performance without the need to be liked. It made it so much more powerful and led to an emotional implosion that was not a tug on the heart as much as a punch in the gut."