THE SCREENING ROOM: PBS "NewsHour" Profiles Stephen Sondheim and MacDowell Colony (Video)

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06 Sep 2013

Stephen Sondheim
Stephen Sondheim
Photo by Joseph Marzullo/WENN

PBS "NewsHour" correspondant Jeffrey Brown sat down with Tony and Pulitzer Prize-winning composer-lyricist Stephen Sondheim in a segment that aired earlier this week and will be rebroadcast Sept. 8.

The segment profiles both Sondheim and the MacDowell Colony, the historic artists' colony in Peterborough, NH, named for musicians Edward and Marian MacDowell. In August, Sondheim was presented with the 54th Edward MacDowell Medal.

Sondheim is the first composer-lyricist whose work is dedicated to musical theatre to receive the honor. Leonard Bernstein received the MacDowell Medal in 1987. Additional theatre artists to receive the honor include Edward Albee, Thornton Wilder and Lillian Hellman.

"You've got to get hungry again. The older and more venerated you get the less hungry you get. And you get sated with the applause and the awards and that sort of thing. But as soon as you get hungry, then it's fun again," Sondheim says in a clip from the segment.

Sondheim, who began his Broadway career as a lyricist for West Side Story and Gypsy, made his debut as a composer/lyricist in 1962 with A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. Along with collaborators including Leonard Bernstein, Arthur Laurents, James Goldman, George Furth, James Lapine, John Weidman and Harold Prince, Sondheim revolutionized the face of musical theatre with Company, Follies, A Little Night Music, Sweeney Todd, Pacific Overtures, Anyone Can Whistle, Merrily We Roll Along, Sunday in the Park with George, Assassins, Into the Woods, Passion and Road Show.



View the segment below: