Even Though Nathan Lane Is About to Play Roy Cohn in Broadway's Angels in America, He's Full of Laughs With Stephen Colbert

Broadway News   Even Though Nathan Lane Is About to Play Roy Cohn in Broadway's Angels in America, He's Full of Laughs With Stephen Colbert
 
In anticipation of his Broadway return in Angels in America, Lane talks about the play, the connection to Donald Trump, and the upcoming Lion King movie remake.

Upon entering the Ed Sullivan Theatre, two-time Tony winner Nathan Lane proved there is no one like him. During his February 9 appearance on The Late Show, the actor led off with an improvised story about how he and host Stephen Colbert first met; it was clear from that moment Lane came to play.

But Lane did talk about bringing Tony Kushner’s two-part epic Angels in America to Broadway after its hit run in London. Lane plays infamous McCarthy-era lawyer Roy Cohn, who was instrumental in the execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg (the latter appears in the play). Or, as Lane puts it, “He was a fun guy.”

“He came back to New York and he was a very successful lawyer and power broker. He was also Donald Trump’s lawyer and mentor until 1986 when he died of AIDS,” said Lane. “He was a brilliant guy if only he had used it for good rather than evil.”

Lane also took time to talk about The Lion King—for which he voiced Timon in the original 1994 animated movie. In the video below, Lane shares the email he received from Billy Eichner (who will voice Timon in the new live-action remake of the movie) and his sarcastic response to Eichner.

Lane won the Tony Award for his performance in The Producers in 2001 and in 1996 for A Funny Thing Happened On The Way to the Forum. He is also known for his Broadway performances in the 1992 revival of Guys and Dolls, Love! Valour! Compassion!, The Man Who Came to Dinner, The Odd Couple, The Addams Family, and It’s Only A Play.

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