Faye's Diary Adds Another Performance April 23

News   Faye's Diary Adds Another Performance April 23 Eydie Faye's The Pages of My Diary I'd Rather Not Read, a runaway hit at Hudson Backstage Theatre in Los Angeles, will add a performance April 23 to satisfy ticket demand. The production is running through April 29. It was to have closed April 15.

Eydie Faye's The Pages of My Diary I'd Rather Not Read, a runaway hit at Hudson Backstage Theatre in Los Angeles, will add a performance April 23 to satisfy ticket demand. The production is running through April 29. It was to have closed April 15.

As reported earlier, Diary has developed a following among the young starlets of Hollywood's movie community. Since the show reopened for a second engagement March 16, representatives for film actresses Drew Barrymore, Reese Witherspoon, Chloe Sevigny and Jennifer Love Hewitt have visited the show. Other performers have reportedly shown interest. No contracts have been signed, however.

After its April run, the show will probably extend one more time at the Hudson and then transfer to a bigger theatre in Los Angeles. Obviously, the involvement of any of the above stars would spur along such a move.

The actresses interest is no doubt born of the looming prospect of an screen actors' strike this summer. Indeed, in the advent of a strike, many film performers are expected to flock back to the theatre.

Barrymore's credits include "The Wedding Singer" and "Charlie's Angels" Witherspoon received enthusiastic notices for her role in the satire, "Election." Hewitt, now in the film "Heartbreakers," is still best known as one of the stars of TV's "Party of Five." Sevigny is the only actress mentioned who can boast recent stage experience: she starred in the New Group's production of Joe Orton's What the Butler Saw Off Broadway in fall 2000. The Pages of My Diary I'd Rather Not Read deals with three young career women of disparate backgrounds struggling to make it in New York City. One is a tough businesswoman with aspirations of becoming a professional writer. Another is a Jewish girl from the West Coast who hopes to succeed as an actress. The third has come from the Midwest to train as a teacher. All three have certain things in common: they come from families in which the biological fatherhas often been absent; they have relatives who occasionally drive them nuts; they've all endured lousy jobs while pursuing their goals; and they're all seeking some form of happiness with men, searching for intimacy but generally finding disappointment.

For tickets and information call (323) 930-9304.

—By Robert Simonson