Julia Roberts to Star in Greenberg's Three Days of Rain on Broadway in Spring 2006

News   Julia Roberts to Star in Greenberg's Three Days of Rain on Broadway in Spring 2006 Julia Roberts will star in a new Broadway production of Richard Greenberg's time-skipping three-hander Three Days of Rain on Broadway this coming spring.
Julia Roberts
Julia Roberts Photo by Columbia Pictures

The New York Times reported that the Hollywood actress will headline the revival of what is Greenberg's most popular play, behind Take Me Out. Joe Mantello—who recently directed Liev Schreiber and Alan Alda in Glengarry Glen Ross and will guide Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick through The Odd Couple this fall—will direct. Performances will begin in March at a Shubert theatre. Marc Platt and David Stone will produce.

The actors playing the two other, male characters have not been named. The Times reported that tickets will go on sale in November. Expect a feeding frenzy.

Broadway has seen many film stars pay visits in recent years, including Denzel Washington, Jessica Lange, Kathleen Turner and Liam Neeson, but Julia Roberts, the top-rated actress in Hollywood, is arguably in a class by herself. Her presence in a play is likely to cause a ticket-buying and publicity frenzy akin to that provoked by Sean Combs when he signed on for A Raisin in the Sun.

According to the Times, the production came together over the last six weeks after a reading held in late June in Los Angeles.

The staging is yet another sign of Greenberg's sudden emergence as one of America's most produced playwrights. He will have two other plays produced in New York this season—A Naked Girl on the Appian Way on Broadway and A House in Town at Lincoln Center—as well as two world premieres in Chicago and Washington, D.C.

Three Days of Rain was first produced Off-Broadway at Manhattan Theatre Club in 1997, with Patricia Clarkson in the Roberts role. The play's three actors play dual roles: a lover's triangle, and their children a generation later. The story begins in the present day and then shifts to a time decades earlier in act two.