London Theatre Offers Several Seasonal Productions

News   London Theatre Offers Several Seasonal Productions

Snow White, Grimms II and Sleeping Beauty are all seasonal plays on in London this winter.

Snow White, which plays at the National Theatre, has a short run, from Nov. 13 to Dec. 12, with morning and afternoon performances only. In a world where snowflakes fall like feathers, where mirrors answer back and there a plenty of dwarves to be seen, Snow White is stranded in a winter forest. Will she escape? A charming, humorous and musical production for the family.

Grimms II, at the Rose and Crown in Hampton Wick from Nov. 25 to Dec. 21, is presented by Horla Theatre Company. Directed by Alistair Green, this is a feast of folk and fairy tales from around the world in which the theatre is transformed into a magical forest where audiences will find all manner of strange characters and objects that have a story to tell.

Discover the Cave of Wisdom and Magic where fables, such as the Russian classic The Baba Yaga, live. Due to the unfortunate death of the dwarfs, comes Horla's own Snow White and the Seven Puppets, in an evening of mime, dance, live music and puppetry, thus enchanting their audience with a rainbow of stories from around the world!

Sleeping Beauty at the Young Vic begins previews Nov. 22 and runs through Jan. 25, 2003. Another fairy tale involving an enchanted forest, theatregoers follow the tale of a young Princess who, cursed by a wicked fairy, pricks her finger and falls into a deep sleep — to be awoken 100 years later by a handsome Prince. Unfortunately his mother's a bit of an ogress...

The Snowman, at the Peacock Theatre, is adapted from Raymond Bigg's magical story, and runs from Nov. 11 to Jan. 12, 2003. Howard Blake's stage version is making its fifth visit to the Peacock, where it has proved a consistently popular Christmas hit.

The story of a small boy who has a magical adventure with a snowman is accompanied by Blake's score — including the song "Walking in the Air" — and by Robert North's choreography.

—By Paul Webb Theatrenow